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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2021

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from: to

Commission file number: 001-36305

SEMLER SCIENTIFIC, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

26-1367393

(State or other jurisdiction

(I.R.S. Employer

of incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

2340-2348 Walsh Avenue, Suite 2344

Santa Clara, CA 95051

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

(877) 774-4211

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

Trading Symbol

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

SMLR

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes No

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $471,533,909 as of June 30, 2021, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of February 25, 2022 was 6,779,058.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

None.

Table of Contents

2021 ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS

    

    

Page

PART I

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements and Industry Data

Risk Factor Summary

Item 1.

Business

4

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

19

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

34

Item 2.

Properties

35

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

35

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosure

35

PART II

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

35

Item 6.

Reserved

36

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

36

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

42

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

42

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

42

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

43

Item 9B.

Other Information

43

Item 9C.

Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions the Prevent Inspections

44

PART III

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

44

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

48

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

51

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

52

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

53

PART IV

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

55

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

57

SIGNATURES

58

In this report, unless otherwise stated or as the context otherwise requires, references to “Semler Scientific,” “the Company,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar references refer to Semler Scientific, Inc. The Semler Scientific logo, QuantaFlo and other trademarks or service marks of Semler Scientific, Inc. appearing in this report are the property of Semler Scientific, Inc. This report also contains registered marks, trademarks and trade names of other companies. All other trademarks, registered marks and trade names appearing in this report are the property of their respective holders.

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND INDUSTRY DATA

This annual report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements include those that express plans, anticipation, intent, contingency, goals, targets or future development and/or otherwise are not statements of historical fact. These forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and projections about future events and they are subject to risks and uncertainties known and unknown that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied in such statements.

In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology, such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “estimates,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “may,” “should,” “continue,” “could” or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. Accordingly, these statements involve estimates, assumptions and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in them. Any forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to the factors discussed throughout this annual report on Form 10-K.

You should read this annual report on Form 10-K and the documents that we reference herein and therein and have filed as exhibits, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. You should assume that the information appearing in this annual report on Form 10-K is accurate as of the date on the front cover of this annual report only. Because the risk factors referred to herein could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf, you should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties, along with others, are described under the heading “Risk Factors.” Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict which factors will arise. In addition, we cannot assess the impact of each factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. We qualify all of the information presented in this annual report on Form 10-K, and particularly our forward-looking statements, by these cautionary statements.

This annual report on Form 10-K includes statistical and other industry and market data that we obtained from industry publications and research, surveys and studies conducted by third parties. Industry publications and third-party research, surveys and studies generally indicate that their information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, although they do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. While we believe these industry publications and third-party research, surveys and studies are reliable, we have not independently verified such data.

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RISK FACTOR SUMMARY

Our business involves significant risks. Below is a summary of the material risks that our business faces, which makes an investment in our common stock speculative and risky. This summary does not address all these risks. These risks are more fully described below under the heading “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of this annual report on Form 10-K. Before making investment decisions regarding our common stock, you should carefully consider these risks. The occurrence of any of the events or developments described below could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, prospects and stock price. In such event, the market price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. In addition, there are also additional risks not described below that are either not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial, and these additional risks could also materially impair our business, operations or market price of our common stock.

If we do not successfully implement our business strategy, our business and results of operations will be adversely affected.
Our business has been and could continue to be adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
We predominantly market only one FDA-cleared product, a vascular testing product; vascular testing may not achieve broad market acceptance or be commercially successful. We may also fail to generate meaningful revenues from our exclusive marketing and distribution arrangement, nor benefit from our recent investments in other companies developing complementary products.
Physicians and other customers may not widely adopt our products unless they determine, based on experience, long-term clinical data and published peer reviewed journal articles, that the use of our products provides a safe and effective alternative to other existing ABI devices.
If healthcare providers are unable to obtain adequate coverage and reimbursement either for procedures performed using our product or patient care incorporating the use of our product, it is unlikely that our product will gain widespread acceptance.
Our vascular testing product is generally but not specifically approved for reimbursement under any third-party payor codes; if third-party payors refuse to reimburse our customers for their use of our product, it could have a material adverse effect on our business.
We rely heavily upon the talents of a small number of key personnel, the loss of whom could severely damage our business.
We rely on a small number of employees in our direct sales force and face challenges and risk in managing and maintaining our distribution network and the parties who make up that network.
To adequately commercialize our products and any new products we add, we may need to increase our sales and marketing network, which will require us to hire, train, retain and supervise employees and other independent contractors.
We do not require our customers to enter into long-term licenses or maintenance contracts for our products or services and may therefore lose customers on short notice.
We are exposed to risk as a significant portion of our revenues and accounts receivables are with a limited number of customers.
We rely on a small number of independent suppliers and facilities for the manufacturing of our vascular testing product. Any delay or disruption in the supply of the product or facility may negatively impact our operations.
Because we operate in an industry with significant product liability risk, and we may not be sufficiently insured against this risk, we may be subject to substantial claims against our product or services that we may provide.
We may implement a product recall or voluntary market withdrawal or stop shipment of our product due to product defects or product enhancements and modifications, which would significantly increase our costs.
If we fail to properly manage our anticipated growth, our business could suffer.
An information security incident, including a cybersecurity breach, could have a negative impact on our business or reputation.
Fluctuations in insurance cost and availability could adversely affect our profitability or our risk management profile.
We will need to generate significant revenues to remain profitable.
Our future financial performance will depend in part on the successful improvements and software updates to our vascular testing product on a cost-effective basis.

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Table of Contents

We operate in an intensely competitive and rapidly changing business environment, and there is a substantial risk our products or service offerings could become obsolete or uncompetitive.
One of our business strategies is developing additional products and service offerings that allow healthcare providers to deliver cost-effective wellness and receive increased compensation for their services. The development of new products and service offerings involves time and expense and we may never realize the benefits of this investment.
We may not realize expected benefits from our investments in other companies, which could harm our business.
Our business is subject to many laws and government regulations governing the manufacture and sale of medical devices, including the FDA’s 510(k) clearance process, and laws and regulations governing patient data and information, among others.
The FDA may change its policies, adopt additional regulations, or revise existing regulations, in particular relating to the 510(k) clearance process.
Our business is subject to unannounced inspections by FDA to determine our compliance with FDA requirements.
Although part of our business strategy is based on payment provisions enacted under government healthcare reform, we also face significant uncertainty in the industry regarding the implementation, transformation or repeal and replacement of the Health Care Reform Law.
The applicable healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations, along with the increased enforcement environment, may lead to an enforcement action targeting us, which could adversely affect our business.
Changes in, or interpretations of, tax rules and regulations may adversely affect our effective tax rates.
Our ability to use net operating loss, or NOL, carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be subject to limitations.
We have had material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. Although we have remedied our prior material weaknesses, if we identify additional material weaknesses in the future, or if our former material weaknesses recur, it could have an adverse effect on our company.
Our success largely depends on our ability to obtain and protect the proprietary information on which we base our product.
We may need to license intellectual property from third parties, and such licenses may not be available or may not be available on commercially reasonable terms.
We may be subject to claims by third parties asserting that our employees or we have misappropriated their intellectual property, or claiming ownership of what we regard as our own intellectual property.
If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position would be harmed.
Our executive officers, directors and significant stockholders, if they choose to act together, have the ability to control all matters submitted to stockholders for approval.

Provisions in our corporate charter documents and under Delaware law could make an acquisition of our company, which may be beneficial to our stockholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

3

Table of Contents

PART I

ITEM 1.   BUSINESS

General

We are a company providing technology solutions to improve the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare providers. Our mission is to develop, manufacture and market innovative products and services that assist our customers in evaluating and treating chronic diseases. Our patented and U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, cleared product, QuantaFlo, measures arterial blood flow in the extremities to aid in the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, or PAD. In April 2021, we entered into an agreement with a private company to exclusively market and distribute Insulin Insights, an FDA-cleared software product that recommends optimal insulin dosing for diabetic patients in the United States, including Puerto Rico, except for selected accounts. We made investments in this private software company and in another private company whose product, Discern, is a test for early Alzheimer’s disease. We continue to develop additional complementary proprietary products in-house, and seek out other arrangements for additional products and services that we believe will bring value to our customers and to our company. We believe our current products and services, and any future products or services that we may offer, position us to provide valuable information to our customer base, which in turn permits them to better guide patient care.

In the year ended December 31, 2021, we had total revenues of $53.0 million and net income of $17.2 million compared to total revenues of $38.6 million and net income of $14.0 million in 2020.

COVID-19 Update

Late in the first quarter and into the second quarter of 2020, we experienced decreased test volumes due to COVID-19 related “social distancing” and other executive orders mandating “shelter-in-place” or similar restrictions. These governmental restrictions limited patient visits by our customers, and restricted participation in trade shows and in-person training. When such restrictions were initially lifted around the country and non-emergency medical services resumed in late 2020, our business returned to and even exceeded pre-COVID-19 levels. However, sales personnel continued to be limited in ability to attend trade shows and conduct in-person training through early 2021.

Notwithstanding these limitations, variable fee license revenues (that is, fee-per-test) rebounded strongly in the first half of 2021 from the effects of the ongoing COVID-19, but decreased sequentially in the second half of 2021. We believe variable fee license revenues experienced a COVID-19 related timing change in the behavior of insurance plans when ordering QuantaFlo testing from our health risk assessment customers. We believe this new pattern of testing earlier in the year and the effect on variable fee license revenues may not continue in 2022 or even beyond 2022. However, in January 2022 compared to December 2021, fixed-fee monthly license revenues increased by approximately 1% while variable fee license revenues (i.e., fee-per-test) increased by approximately 87%. Comparing January 2022 to January 2021, fixed-fee monthly license revenues increased by approximately 13%, while variable fee license revenues increased by approximately 6%. All numbers for January 2022 are preliminary and unaudited.

As we look forward into 2022, there is continued uncertainty as outbreaks of variants continue to occur and vaccination rates lag in certain jurisdictions. New, additional or different restrictions could be imposed, which could impact the usage of our product by our customers or further impact timing of demand for our products.

Our Products and Services

We currently market a patented and FDA-cleared, vascular testing product, QuantaFlo, to our customers, who include insurance plans, physician groups and risk assessment groups. We also have an exclusive distribution arrangement for the United States, including Puerto Rico, to distribute Insulin Insights, an FDA-cleared, software solution designed to provide insulin dosing recommendations to clinicians for the adjustment and maintenance of blood

4

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glucose levels in insulin-dependent patients with Type 2 diabetes. We believe this product will be attractive to our existing customers as well as help expand our customer base.

QuantaFlo

QuantaFlo is a four-minute in-office blood flow test. Healthcare providers can use blood flow measurements as part of their examinations of a patient’s vascular condition, including assessments of patients who have vascular disease. The following diagram illustrates the use of QuantaFlo:

Graphic

QuantaFlo features a sensor clamp that is placed on the toe or finger much like current pulse oximetry devices. Infrared light emitted from the clamp on the dorsal surface of the digit is scattered and reflected by the red blood cells coursing through the area of illumination. Returning light is ‘sensed’ by the sensor. A blood flow waveform is instantaneously constructed by our proprietary software algorithm. Both index fingers and both large toes are interrogated, which takes about 30 seconds for each. A hardcopy report form is generated that displays four waveforms and the ratio of each leg measurement compared with the arms. Results are classified as Flow Obstruction or No Flow Obstruction.

We have primarily developed a license model rather than an outright sales model for QuantaFlo. This license model eliminates the need to make a capital equipment sale. Consequently, we generally require no down payment or long-term commitment from our customers. QuantaFlo has an expected average lifetime of at least three years. We intend to reevaluate the monthly price periodically in consideration of the revenue generation associated with QuantaFlo. To date, we roughly estimate that routine office usage of the QuantaFlo has ranged from a few tests per week up to 10 tests per day. We also offer contracts in which we invoice on a per test basis for use of QuantaFlo. Approximately 59% of our customers are on the fixed-fee software licensing model, whereas 41% are on the variable fee model based on usage.

We have placed our QuantaFlo product with healthcare insurance plans, integrated delivery networks, independent physician groups and companies contracting with the healthcare industry such as risk assessment groups, in addition to doctors’ offices. Our largest customer is a U.S. diversified healthcare company and its affiliated plans, and in the year ended December 31, 2021, it accounted for 40.8% of our revenues compared to 47.2% in the prior year.

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Other Blood Flow Testing Methods

Blood flow is the amount of blood delivered to a given region per unit time, whereas blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of arteries. Given a fixed resistance, blood flow and blood pressure are proportional. The traditional ankle brachial index, or ABI, with Doppler test uses a blood pressure cuff to measure the systolic blood pressure in the lower legs and in the arms. A blood pressure cuff is inflated proximal to the artery in question. Using a Doppler device, the inflation continues until the pulse in the artery ceases. The blood pressure cuff is then slowly deflated. When the artery’s pulse is re-detected through the Doppler probe the pressure in the cuff at that moment indicates the systolic pressure of that artery. The test is repeated on all four extremities. Well-established criteria for the ratio of the blood pressure in a leg compared to the blood pressure in the arms are used to assess the presence or absence of flow obstruction. Generally, these tests take 15 minutes to perform and require a vascular technician to be done properly. Like QuantaFlo, the traditional analog ABI test with Doppler is a non-invasive physiologic measurement that may be abnormal in the presence of PAD. Alternatively, primary care physicians may palpate the pedal pulses to assess blood flow in the lower extremities. However, pulse palpation is generally not sensitive for the detection of vascular disease. Other options to detect arterial obstructions are imaging systems that use ultrasound, x-ray technology or magnetic resonance to obtain anatomic information about blood vessels in the legs. However, as compared to QuantaFlo, imaging tests are much more expensive and are performed by specialists in special laboratories or offices.

Insulin Insights

Insulin Insights is a software program that is used by a healthcare provider to optimize out-patient insulin dosing. Following our October 2020 minority investment in its owner, in April 2021, we entered into an agreement to exclusively market and distribute this software program in the United States, including Puerto Rico, except for selected accounts. Under this agreement, we pre-paid for $2.0 million of licenses, and signed our first customer to a license in September 2021. Unless early terminated in accordance with its terms, the exclusive distribution agreement will remain in full force and effect until April 1, 2026, and thereafter there is an option for this agreement to be automatically renewed for additional one-year terms.

We currently intend to distribute Insulin Insights using a software as a service, or SAAS, license model rather than an outright sales model for Insulin Insights based on a per patient per month fee. We generally require no down payment or long-term commitment from our customers. We intend to reevaluate the price periodically. As we only recently began distributing licenses, to date, we do not have enough experience with the product to be able estimate routine usage of Insulin Insights in terms of patients per office.

We will seek to distribute Insulin Insights to healthcare insurance plans, integrated delivery networks, independent physician groups, and companies that contract with the healthcare industry, such as risk assessment groups, long-term care, or remote patient monitoring organizations, in addition to doctors’ offices. We believe that this software product will be of interest to our existing customer base, as well as help us to expand interest in QuantaFlo to additional customers.

Market Opportunity

QuantaFlo

Fee-for-service is a payment model where services are unbundled and paid for separately. In health care, it gives an incentive for physicians to provide more treatments because payment is dependent on the quantity of care, rather than quality of care. Capitation is a payment arrangement that pays a physician or group of physicians a set amount for each enrolled person assigned to them, per period of time, whether or not that person seeks care. The amount of remuneration is based on the average expected healthcare utilization of that patient, with greater payment for patients with significant medical history. For Medicare Advantage patients, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, pays a fee per patient, also known as capitation. CMS uses risk adjustment to adjust capitation payments to health plans, either higher or lower, to account for the differences in expected health costs of individuals. Accordingly, under CMS guidelines, risk factor adjustments per patient will provide payment that is higher for sicker patients who have conditions that are

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codified. Accordingly, there is a financial incentive to identify those Medicare Advantage patients that are sicker, including those that have undiagnosed ailments such as PAD.

The coding system used by CMS for the Medicare Advantage program is a hierarchical condition category, or HCC, diagnostic classification system that begins by classifying over 14,000 diagnosis codes into 805 diagnostic groups, or DXGs. Each code maps to exactly one DXG, which represents a well-specified medical condition, such as DXG 96.01 pre-cerebral or cerebral arterial occlusion with infarction. DXGs are further aggregated into 189 condition categories, or CCs. CCs describe a broader set of similar diseases. Diseases within a CC are related clinically and with respect to cost. An example is CC96 Ischemic or Unspecified Stroke, which includes DXGs 96.01 and 96.02 acute but ill-defined cerebrovascular disease. We believe that quality of care measured by completeness and wellness is an economic benefit. These changes are already in place for the approximately 26 million participants in the Medicare Advantage program and are expected to expand to more types of insured patients as healthcare reform is deployed.

Undiagnosed vascular diseases are major under-diagnosed health problems in the United States. These conditions are common and deadly cardiovascular disease that is often undiagnosed. As with clogged arteries in the heart, clogged arteries in the legs place patients at an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Published studies have shown that persons with PAD are four times more likely to die of heart attack, and two to three times more likely to die of stroke. According to a study by P.G. Steg published in the JAMA, patients with PAD have a 21% event rate of cardiovascular death, heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular hospitalization within 12 months. The SAGE Group has estimated that as many as 20 million people are affected with PAD in the United States alone and A.T. Hirsch et al. in a JAMA published article further estimate that only 11% have claudication (pain on exertion), a classic symptom of PAD.

Many people affected with PAD do not have noticeable symptoms. When symptoms of PAD are present, they often include fatigue, heaviness, cramping or pain in the legs during activity, leg or foot pain, sores, wounds or ulcers on the toes, feet, or legs, which are slow to heal, shortness of breath, peripheral edema, or enlarged liver. Persons with PAD may become disabled and not be able to work.

Risk factors for developing PAD include:

Age (over 50 years)

Race (African-American)

History of smoking

Diabetes

High blood pressure

High blood cholesterol

Personal history of vascular disease, heart attack, or stroke.

We believe medical personnel who care for those older than 50 years are the target market for QuantaFlo, along with those insurance plans that have a high number of Medicare Advantage patients. Based on U.S. Census data, we believe there are more than 80 million older Americans who could be evaluated for the presence of PAD.

According to the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, there are over 275,000 medical professionals practicing primary care in the United States. In addition, based on American Heart Association data, there are over 20,000 cardiologists and 7,500 vascular and cardiovascular surgeons. Also, there are millions of diabetic patients seen routinely by endocrinologists. Many podiatrists who see patients with these problems and orthopedic surgeons may see value in screening patients for circulation issues prior to leg procedures. Neurologists may need a tool to differentiate leg pain from vascular versus neurologic etiology. Nephrologists see patients with kidney disease, who have a higher frequency of PAD. Wound care centers need to know the adequacy of limb perfusion. We expect that each physician

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will have many patient visits annually from people older than 50 years. While it is standard practice to ask about symptoms of PAD and to look for signs on physical exam, we believe that it is often the case in busy practices that the questions go unasked.

Generally speaking, individual products are not specifically approved by name under a third-party payor code. Physicians who seek reimbursement for PAD testing procedures are likely to use codes that describe non-invasive physiologic testing. We do not track directly how physicians code for and receive payment for such procedures.

Insulin Insights

Of the growing diabetic population in the United States, over a quarter use insulin according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Insulin is a necessary medication as nearly all Type 1 diabetics (approximately 1.6 million people in the United States, and roughly 21% of Type 2 diabetics (of the over 30 million people in the United States with Type 2 diabetics) must also use insulin to bring their blood glucose levels down to a healthy range. Without insulin, patients are likely to suffer from blurred vision, weight loss, and intolerable thirst. Eventually, uncontrolled diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, gangrene, loss of limbs, and ultimately death. Tighter control of glucose is proven to improve the outcomes in diabetes care.

In the United States, about 90% of diabetic patients treating with insulin are managed by primary care practitioners. Insulin Insights is designed to be used by such practitioners to recommend optimal insulin dosing for each individual patient.

CMS has established a star rating system called the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set, or HEDIS. This system rates how a health plan’s Medicare Advantage program performs across the various HEDIS quality measures on a five-star scale. A comprehensive diabetes program is included in the HEDIS measures for members age 18-75 with diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2). It specifically measures the percentage of plan members who had an HbA1c test during the year and demonstrate good control (<9.0%). Based on the star ratings, high performing health plans are also eligible to be paid bonuses by CMS. We believe this provides a financial incentive to potential customers for an Insulin Insights software license, as it will assist them in working with their diabetic patients to optimize insulin dosing and achieve better control of their blood glucose levels.

Other Products and Services

In November 2021, we terminated our September 2020 exclusive distribution agreement for its product line in the United States, including Puerto Rico, and are now focusing our efforts on additional products and services that we believe are complementary to our existing offering.

In addition to our internal research and development efforts, in October 2020, we invested in an additional private company that has developed a product, Discern, a test for early Alzheimer’s disease. We do not have a distribution agreement for Discern.

Strategy

Our mission is to develop, manufacture and market products and services that assist healthcare providers in evaluating and treating chronic diseases. We intend to do this by:

Targeting customers with patients at risk of developing PAD. Healthcare providers use blood flow measurements as part of their assessment of a patient’s vascular condition. Our strategy is to keep marketing QuantaFlo on a recurrent revenue model to insurance plans and medical personnel who care for those older than 50 years, including cardiologists, internists, nephrologists, endocrinologist, podiatrists, and family practitioners. Specifically, we believe there are more than 400,000 physicians and other potential customers in the United States alone, many of whom care for patients will be more than 50 years old and at increased risk of developing PAD. Based on U.S. Census data, the evaluable patient population for QuantaFlo is estimated to be more than 80 million patients in the United States annually.

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Expanding the tools available to internists and non-peripheral vascular experts. Our intention is to provide a tool to internists and non-peripheral vascular experts, for whom it was previously impractical to conduct a blood flow measurement unless in a specialized vascular laboratory. For vascular specialists, QuantaFlo does not require the use of blood pressure cuffs (which should not be used on some breast cancer patients), and measures without blood pressure in obese patients and patients with non-compressible, hard, calcified arteries. Currently, these patients often are unable to be measured satisfactorily with traditional analog ABI devices.
Developing additional product and service offerings that allow healthcare providers to deliver cost-effective wellness and receive increased compensation for their services. In March 2015, we received FDA 510(k) clearance of our product, QuantaFlo, reflecting several updates and modifications to the original model that were developed in conjunction with our consultant engineering groups. We are also exploring potential new product and service offerings through our research and development programs. These product and service offerings are designed to provide cost-effective wellness solutions for our growing, established customer base. Our goal is to achieve a reputation for outstanding service and the provision of cost-effective wellness solutions, while leveraging our gains in the marketplace for such product and service offerings.
Exploring additional product and service offerings through arrangements or potential acquisitions. In addition to our in-house research and development efforts, we are also seeking out opportunities to expand our product and service offerings through marketing, distribution and licensing arrangements, such as our agreement to exclusively market and distribute Insulin Insights line in the United States, including Puerto Rico. Such arrangements will allow us to sell products related to chronic disease management through our network of physicians and other customers. We may also consider opportunistically acquiring additional products if we believe they fit within our strategy.

Sales and Marketing

We provide our QuantaFlo product to our customers through our salespersons and our co-exclusive distributor, Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc., or Bard, a large medical device company with a worldwide presence in both interventional cardiology and dialysis, which was acquired by Becton, Dickinson and Company in December 2017. Sales through Bard accounted for less than 3% of our revenues in each of 2021 and 2020. In addition to our co-exclusive distributor, we have direct sales and marketing representatives who have experience selling products and services to our anticipated market.

We deliver our vascular testing product directly to our customers, and in-service training to the customers is provided either on-line or in person. Because QuantaFlo is relatively easy to use training can generally be accomplished in less than one day.

Customers who have licensed our QuantaFlo product may pay by credit card or check generally on the 15th of each month as an advance for usage during the next 30 days. In some cases, customers prefer an annual license paid in advance. We provide technical support daily, coupled directly to the manufacturing operation so that replacement products, if needed, can be shipped overnight directly to the customer. The majority of the support is over the telephone and focuses on software and connectivity issues, rather than hardware. We plan to upgrade QuantaFlo operating systems as appropriate by direct shipments.

In addition to the license model with a fixed monthly fee, we also have contracts that charge a variable monthly fee, in which we invoice based on the number of tests performed with QuantaFlo. In addition to licensing the QuantaFlo software, we have sold QuantaFlo equipment and accessories.

In April 2021, we entered into an agreement with Mellitus Health Inc., a private company, to exclusively market and distribute Insulin Insights, a new software product, in the United States, including Puerto Rico, except for selected accounts, and pre-paid for $2.0 million of software licenses. In September 2021, we signed several customers to a license for this product but as of December 31, 2021, we had not generated any material revenues from this product.

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Manufacturing

We manufacture our product, QuantaFlo, in the United States through independent contractors whom we pay for finished goods. Our contracts provide for subassemblies, product final assembly, test, serialization, finished goods, inventory and shipping operations. Our current contracts will remain in force until terminated by us upon three months written notice, or until terminated by either party for cause. Although we believe we have a good working relationship with our current contract manufacturers, there are many such qualified contract manufacturers available around the country should we need to replace them or if they are not able to meet demand as we grow our business as anticipated. While our current independent contract manufacturers source some supplies from China, we believe QuantaFlo is relatively easy to manufacture, and should we encounter issues due to supply chain disruptions as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we believe alternative sources should be available. We employ a consultant vendor qualification expert to monitor and test the quality controls and quality assurance procedures of our contract manufacturer.

Competition

The principal competitor for QuantaFlo is the standard blood pressure cuff ABI device. QuantaFlo does not include a blood pressure cuff. There are several companies that manufacture the traditional ABI device, which range in price from $2,500 to $20,000. Some of these companies are much larger than us and have more financial resources and their own distributor network. The traditional ABI devices are differentiated by the degree of automation designed into each product. ABI devices that rely more heavily on operator assessment (i.e., listening to the return of pulse while decreasing cuff pressure), are thought to have less objectivity in their measurement. Because standard ABI devices require a better trained operator, the products are usually sold to specialized vascular labs that are supervised by a vascular surgeon, with the tests performed by a licensed vascular technician. It is not uncommon for such ABI devices to be marketed to the offices of internists, podiatrists, endocrinologists or most cardiologists.

Our intention is to provide a tool to internists and non-peripheral vascular experts, for whom it was previously impractical to conduct a blood flow measurement unless in a specialized vascular laboratory. For vascular specialists, QuantaFlo does not require the use of blood pressure cuffs (which should not be used on some breast cancer patients), and measures without blood pressure in obese patients and patients with non-compressible, hard, calcified arteries. Currently, these patients often are unable to be measured with traditional analog ABI devices.

Competitors are beginning to market competing digital devices seeking to provide fast results that may be used outside of a specialized vascular laboratory. Given the potential size of the PAD market, we expect competitors to continue to enter the space.

Research and Development Program

We have dedicated engineering consultants that are well integrated into our overall business, ranging from customer requirements to technical support. The engineering group uses our in-house quality system as its framework for new product development and release. The majority of the engineering is circuit design and software development. We are currently developing several updates and modifications to QuantaFlo in conjunction with our consultant engineering groups, as well as exploring potential new product and service offerings. These product and service offerings are being designed to provide cost-effective wellness solutions for our growing, established customer base. The new products and service offerings under development or that may be developed may incorporate some of our current technology or new technology. We are also directing much of our activity to building our trade secrets and protecting proprietary positions.

We have sponsored several studies of our blood flow measurement products or provided data to authors on the use of our products for review and publication. One of these studies, the results of which were compiled in 2012 and published in a peer reviewed journal in 2013, sought to determine the frequency of finding undiscovered vascular disease in primary care practices using our vascular testing product. In the study of 632 patients at 19 office practices, the frequency of flow obstruction was 12% and of these patients, 75% did not have classic symptoms of PAD. Among other limitations of the study, the publication mentioned the study’s retrospective design, no direct comparison to other vascular tests and passive data collection such that 8% of patients had one or more missing data fields.

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Another study we sponsored was designed to assess the side-by-side performance of our vascular testing product compared with traditional analog ABI with Doppler measurements in medical practices. In the study of 181 limbs from 121 patients at 5 medical practices during 2012 and 2013, three techniques were used on all limbs: our test, traditional analog ABI with Doppler, and Duplex ultrasound imaging as a gold standard. Traditional analog ABI with Doppler was unable to perform a conclusive study in 8.7% of limbs. In the remaining limbs, our vascular testing product and the ABI with Doppler measurements were in agreement, or in other words concordant, in 78% of limbs. Among the discordant limbs, Duplex imaging judged that the true positive rate of our vascular testing product was significantly higher than that of ABI with Doppler by a 2 to 1 margin. The results of the study are available as a white paper that may be shown to potential customers or other interested parties. Among other limitations of the study, the study had a small sample size, was conducted at specialty practices not primary care practices, had a retrospective design with incomplete collection of demographic information and clinical characteristics of the population, was not peer reviewed and was sponsored by us.

Another study also was designed to assess the side-by-side performance of our vascular testing product compared with traditional analog ABI with Doppler measurements in medical practices. In this prospective study at five medical practices during 2013 through 2015, 360 limbs from 180 patients were examined with three techniques: Our vascular testing product, traditional analog ABI with Doppler, and Duplex ultrasound imaging as a gold standard. Results demonstrated that our test demonstrated greater sensitivity, greater accuracy and equivalent specificity compared to ABI with Doppler measurements. The results of the study are available as a white paper. Among limitations of the study are that it had a small sample size, was conducted at a mix of primary care and specialty practices, had no formal tracking of consecutive patients, and was sponsored by us.

Another study, the results of which were compiled and published in a peer reviewed journal in 2018, reported an analysis of a registry of screening PAD testing with our product between January 2017 and July 2017. In this study, 226,565 patients were tested and 31.3% had moderate to severe flow impairment in the lower extremities. Further analysis of a subset of 26,459 patients for whom clinical characteristics were recorded showed that 95% were asymptomatic. The authors concluded that earlier recognition of PAD may lead to earlier secondary preventive measures and improved outcomes for a population with a high-risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Among other limitations of the study, the publication mentioned the study’s retrospective design and that clinical factors were recorded for only approximately 10% of patients.

A retrospective case series compiled and published in a peer reviewed journal in 2018 reported on 48 patients that were tested with our product and subsequently had a contrast angiography procedure for clinical indications. Using contrast angiography as the gold standard for determining PAD, the author concluded the data supports the use of our product as an aid for practicing physicians to accurately diagnose PAD in combination with clinical judgment. Among other limitations of the study, the sample size was small, tests were performed at specialty centers, and the analysis was done retrospectively.

Certain racial and economic groups in the United States are underserved by the medical community with limited access to specialists, a lack of early detection programs and inadequate preventive disease management. There is abundant evidence that certain ethnic populations are more at risk for cardiovascular disease and suffer sequelae of untreated PAD. A study was compiled and published in a peer reviewed journal in 2018 that presented a retrospective analysis of 1,901 patients tested with our product at 22 medical practices that serve predominately lower-income, non-white populations. The author concluded that our product can be effectively utilized by primary care clinicians in poor and underserved communities to identify PAD. The author posited that identifying PAD earlier in the disease process can be an important step towards filling the unmet need of higher intensity vascular care for minority populations. Limitations of the study include that it was a retrospective analysis and that there was no protocol to unveil the identity or ethnicity of any of the individual patients.

Women may lack early detection programs and have inadequate preventive disease management. A study was compiled and published in a peer reviewed journal in 2019 that presented a retrospective analysis of 68,402 female patients tested with our product at primary care medical practices in the United States. The author concluded that our product was an efficient means to aid in the diagnosis of PAD in vulnerable women who are currently underserved by their health care providers. Limitations of the study include that it was a retrospective analysis with self-reporting of clinical characteristics.

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A February 2022 published peer-reviewed study analyzed screening tests using QuantaFlo for undetected and asymptomatic PAD in a Medicare Advantage population between January 2016 and December 2016. In this study, 13,971 patients were tested and 31.6% had a positive result for PAD. Almost 60% had lower socio-economic income level with 15.1% living under the poverty level. The risk associated with detecting PAD was substantial with a 60-70% increased risk of all-cause mortality or morbidity at one year and a 40-50% increased risk of all-cause mortality or morbidity at three years. The risk was not modified by a history of coronary or cerebrovascular artery disease. The authors concluded that these findings highlight an enormous potential to realize cost-savings by reducing cardiovascular event rates and deploying population-based PAD risk mitigation strategies. Among other limitations of the study, the publication mentioned that they were not able to study the potential impact of PAD risk management strategies used after a positive PAD screen was communicated with the primary care provider and patient. This may have led to an underestimation of the true risk as targeted PAD risk management and behavior modification strategies may have been initiated at the discretion of the provider and patient.

Patents and Licenses

We have been issued one patent for our apparatus, U.S. Patent No. 7,628,760, which expires December 11, 2027.

Government Regulation

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Regulation

QuantaFlo is a medical device subject to extensive regulation by the FDA and other federal, state, local and foreign regulatory bodies. FDA regulations govern, among other things, the following activities that we or our partners perform and will continue to perform:

product design and development;
product testing;
product manufacturing;
product safety;
post-market adverse event reporting;
post-market surveillance;
product labeling;
product storage;
record keeping;
pre-market clearance or approval;
post-market approval studies;
advertising and promotion; and
product sales and distribution.

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FDA’s Pre-market Clearance and Approval Requirements

To commercially distribute QuantaFlo or any future medical device we develop requires or will require either prior 510(k) clearance or prior approval of a pre-market approval, or PMA, application from the FDA. The FDA classifies medical devices into one of three classes. Devices deemed to pose lower risk are placed in either class I or II, which requires the manufacturer to submit to the FDA a pre-market notification requesting permission for commercial distribution. This process is known as 510(k) clearance. Some low risk devices are exempt from this requirement. Devices deemed by the FDA to pose the greatest risk, such as life-sustaining, life-supporting or implantable devices, or devices deemed not substantially equivalent to a previously cleared 510(k) device are placed in class III, requiring approval of a PMA application. Both pre-market clearance and PMA applications are subject to the payment of user fees, paid at the time of submission for FDA review. The FDA can also impose restrictions on the sale, distribution or use of devices at the time of their clearance or approval, or subsequent to marketing.

510(k) Clearance Pathway

To obtain 510(k) clearance, a medical device manufacturer must submit a pre-market notification demonstrating that the proposed device is substantially equivalent to a previously cleared 510(k) device or a device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976 for which the FDA has not yet called for the submission of PMA applications. The FDA’s 510(k) clearance pathway usually takes from three to 12 months from the date the application is completed, but it can take significantly longer, and clearance is never assured. Although many 510(k) pre-market notifications are cleared without clinical data, in some cases, the FDA requires significant clinical data to support substantial equivalence. In reviewing pre-market notification, the FDA may request additional information, including clinical data, which may significantly prolong the review process. After a device receives 510(k) clearance, any modification that could significantly affect its safety or effectiveness, or that would constitute a major change in its intended use, will require a new 510(k) clearance or could require a PMA application. The FDA requires each manufacturer to make this determination initially, but the FDA can review any such decision and can disagree with a manufacturer’s determination. If the FDA disagrees with a manufacturer’s determination regarding whether a new pre-market submission is required for the modification of an existing device, the FDA can require the manufacturer to cease marketing and/or recall the modified device until 510(k) clearance or approval of a PMA application is obtained.

Pre-market Approval Pathway

A PMA application must be submitted if the device cannot be cleared through the 510(k) clearance process and requires proof of the safety and effectiveness of the device to the FDA’s satisfaction. Accordingly, a PMA application must be supported by extensive data including, but not limited to, technical information regarding device design and development, preclinical and clinical trials, data and manufacturing and labeling to support the FDA’s determination that the device is safe and effective for its intended use. After a PMA application is complete, the FDA begins an in-depth review of the submitted information, which generally takes between one and three years, but may take significantly longer. During this review period, the FDA may request additional information or clarification of information already provided. Also, during the review period, an advisory panel of experts from outside the FDA may be convened to review and evaluate the application and provide recommendations to the FDA as to the approvability of the device. In addition, the FDA will conduct a preapproval inspection of the manufacturing facility to ensure compliance with Quality System Regulations, or QSRs, which impose elaborate design development, testing, control, documentation and other quality assurance procedures in the design and manufacturing process. The FDA may approve a PMA application with post-approval conditions intended to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the device including, among other things, restrictions on labeling, promotion, sale and distribution and collection of long-term follow-up data from patients in the clinical study that supported approval. Failure to comply with the conditions of approval can result in materially adverse enforcement action, including the loss or withdrawal of the approval. New PMA applications or PMA application supplements are required for significant modifications to the manufacturing process, labeling and design of a device that is approved through the PMA process. PMA supplements often require submission of the same type of information as a PMA application, except that the supplement is limited to information needed to support any changes from the device covered by the original PMA application, and may not require as extensive clinical data or the convening of an advisory panel.

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Pervasive and Continuing FDA Regulation

After a device is placed on the market, regardless of its classification or pre-market pathway, numerous regulatory requirements apply. These include, but are not limited to:

establishment registration and device listings with the FDA;
Quality System Regulations, which require manufacturers to follow stringent design, testing, process control, documentation and other quality assurance procedures;
labeling regulations, which prohibit the promotion of products for uncleared or unapproved, i.e., “off-label,” uses and impose other restrictions on labeling;
medical device reporting regulations, which require that manufacturers report to the FDA if their device may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or malfunctioned in a way that would likely cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if it were to recur;
corrections and removal reporting regulations, which require that manufacturers report to the FDA field corrections and product recalls or removals if undertaken to reduce a risk to health posed by the device or to remedy a violation of the U.S. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, or FDCA, that may present a risk to health; and
requirements to conduct post-market surveillance studies to establish continued safety data.

The FDA enforces these requirements by inspection and market surveillance. Failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements can result in enforcement action by the FDA, which may include any of the following sanctions:

untitled letters or warning letters;
fines, injunctions and civil penalties;
recall or seizure of our products;
operating restrictions, partial suspension or total shutdown of production;
refusing our request for 510(k) clearance or pre-market approval of new products;
withdrawing 510(k) clearance or pre-market approvals that are already granted; and
criminal prosecution.

We are subject to unannounced device inspections by the FDA and the California Food and Drug Branch. These inspections may include our suppliers’ facilities.

Third-Party Coverage and Reimbursement

We cannot control whether or not providers who use QuantaFlo will seek third-party coverage for such procedures or reimbursement. If providers intend to seek third-party coverage or reimbursement for use of QuantaFlo, the success of our product could become dependent on the availability of coverage and reimbursement from third-party payors, such as governmental programs including Medicare and Medicaid, private insurance plans and managed care programs. Reimbursement is contingent on established coding for a given procedure, coverage of the codes by the third-party payors and adequate payment for the resources used.

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Physician coding for procedures is established by the American Medical Association. CMS, the agency responsible for administering Medicare and Medicaid, and the National Center for Health Statistics, are jointly responsible for overseeing changes and modifications to billing codes used by hospitals for reporting inpatient procedures, and many private payors use coverage decisions and payment amounts determined by CMS as guidelines in setting their coverage and reimbursement policies. All physician and hospital coding is subject to change, which could impact coverage and reimbursement and physician practice behavior. We do not track denial of requests for reimbursement made by the users of QuantaFlo. It is our belief that such denials have occurred and might occur in the future with more or less frequency. We are not in the business of performing QuantaFlo measurements that require us to seek reimbursement from third-party payors, including governmental healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, commercial health insurers, including those that offer Medicare Advantage plans, and managed care programs. Many of our customers are third-party payors who pay us directly for use of our product and services.

Independent of the coding status, third-party payors may deny coverage based on their own criteria, such as if they believe that the clinical efficacy of a device or procedure is not well established and is deemed experimental or investigational, is not the most cost-effective treatment available, or is used for an unapproved indication. We will continue to provide the appropriate resources to patients, physicians, hospitals and insurers in order to promote the best in patient care and clarity regarding reimbursement and work to obtain appropriate coverage policies. For some governmental programs, such as Medicaid, coverage and reimbursement differ from state to state, and some state Medicaid programs may not pay an adequate amount for the procedures performed with our products, if any payment is made at all. As the portion of the U.S. population over the age of 65 and eligible for Medicaid continues to grow, we may be more vulnerable to coverage and reimbursement limitations imposed by CMS. National and regional coverage policy decisions are subject to unforeseeable change and have the potential to impact physician behavior. For example, if CMS decreases the monthly payment for a 65-year-old patient, then the provider will have to decide which steps to eliminate from his or her routine office visits in order to maintain a profitable business model. If the time of an office visit will need to be reduced to maintain a profitable business, a provider may decide to eliminate certain services or conducting certain procedures, such as deciding not to use a thermometer, take someone’s blood pressure or use a QuantaFlo to run an ABI test. Thus, reimbursement limitations imposed by CMS on providers may affect their decision making about which services to provide during an office visit, which could affect our company.

Particularly in the United States, third-party payors carefully review, have undertaken cost-containment initiatives, and increasingly challenge, the prices charged for procedures and medical products as well as any technology that they, in their own judgment, consider experimental or investigational. In addition, an increasing percentage of insured individuals are receiving their medical care through managed care programs, which monitor and often require pre-approval or pre-authorization of the services that a member will receive. Many managed care programs are paying their providers on a capitated basis, which puts the providers at financial risk for the services provided to their patients by paying them a predetermined amount per member per month. The percentage of individuals covered by managed care programs is expected to grow in the United States over the next decade.

There can be no assurance that third-party coverage and reimbursement will be available or adequate, or that future legislation, regulation, or coverage and reimbursement policies of third-party payors will not adversely affect the demand for our products or our ability to sell these products on a profitable basis. The unavailability or inadequacy of third-party payor coverage or reimbursement could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

Our operations may be subject to federal and state healthcare laws and regulations including fraud and abuse laws, such as anti-kickback and false claims laws, data privacy and security laws and transparency laws related to payments and/or other transfers of value made to physicians and other healthcare professionals and teaching hospitals.

The federal Anti-Kickback Law prohibits unlawful inducements for the referral of business reimbursable under federally-funded healthcare programs, such as remuneration provided to physicians to induce them to use certain tissue products or medical devices reimbursable by Medicare or Medicaid. The federal Anti-Kickback Law is subject to evolving interpretations. For example, the government has enforced the federal Anti-Kickback Law to reach large

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settlements with healthcare companies based on, among other things, inappropriate consultant arrangements with physicians or questionable joint venture arrangements. The majority of states also have anti-kickback laws, which establish similar prohibitions that may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including commercial insurers. Further, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, or collectively the Health Care Reform Law, among other things, amended the intent requirement of the federal Anti-Kickback Law and criminal healthcare fraud statutes. A person or entity no longer needs to have actual knowledge of this statute or specific intent to violate it in order to have committed a violation. In addition, the Health Care Reform Law provided that the government may assert that a claim including items or services resulting from a violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Law constitutes a false or fraudulent claim for purposes of the civil False Claims Act and certain criminal healthcare fraud statutes.

Additionally, the civil False Claims Act prohibits knowingly presenting or causing the presentation of a false, fictitious or fraudulent claim for payment to the U.S. government. Actions under the False Claims Act may be brought by the Attorney General or as a qui tam action by a private individual in the name of the government. The federal government is using the civil False Claims Act, and the accompanying threat of significant liability, in its investigations of healthcare providers and suppliers throughout the country for a wide variety of Medicare billing practices and has obtained multi-million and multi-billion dollar settlements in addition to individual criminal convictions. In addition, off-label promotion has been pursued as a violation of the federal False Claims Act. Pursuant to FDA regulations, we can only market our products for cleared or approved uses. Although physicians are permitted to use medical devices for indications other than those cleared or approved by the FDA based on their independent medical judgment, we are prohibited from promoting products for such off-label uses. Given the significant size of actual and potential settlements, it is expected that the government will continue to devote substantial resources to investigating healthcare providers’ and suppliers’ compliance with the healthcare reimbursement rules and fraud and abuse laws.

Additionally, the majority of states in which we market our products have similar fraud and abuse laws, such as anti-kickback, false claims, anti-fee splitting and self-referral laws, which may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including commercial insurers, and violations may result in substantial civil, criminal and administrative penalties.

The Health Care Reform Law also imposed new reporting and disclosure requirements on device manufacturers for any “transfer of value” made or distributed to physicians (defined to include doctors, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists and chiropractors) and teaching hospitals. Such information is now made publicly available in a searchable format, and device manufacturers are now required to report and disclose any investment interests held by physicians and their family members during the preceding calendar year. Beginning in 2022, applicable manufacturers will also be required to report such information regarding their payments and other transfers of value to physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, anesthesiologist assistants, certified registered nurse anesthetists and certified nurse midwives during the previous year. Failure to submit required information may result in significant civil monetary penalties for all payments, transfers of value or ownership or investment interests not reported in an annual submission. Additionally, the commercial compliance environment is continually evolving in the healthcare industry as some states, including California, Massachusetts and Vermont, mandate implementation of corporate compliance programs, along with the tracking and reporting of gifts, compensation and other remuneration to physicians. The shifting compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply in multiple jurisdictions with different compliance and/or reporting requirements increases the possibility that a healthcare company may run afoul of one or more of the requirements.

Our business operations may also be subject to certain federal and state laws regarding the use and disclosure of individually identifiable health information, such as the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009, which impose obligations on certain entities with respect to safeguarding the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information.

In addition, the federal Physician Payments Sunshine Act requires certain manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologics and medical supplies for which payment is available under Medicare, Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, with specific exceptions, to report annually to CMS information related to payments or other transfers of value

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made to physicians (defined to include doctors, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists, and chiropractors) and teaching hospitals, and applicable manufacturers and applicable group purchasing organizations to report annually to CMS ownership and investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members. Beginning in 2022, applicable manufacturers will also be required to report information regarding payments and other transfers of value provided during the previous year to physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse anesthetists, anesthesiologist assistants, and certified nurse-midwives.

To enforce compliance with the federal laws, the U.S. Department of Justice, or DOJ, has increased its scrutiny of interactions between healthcare companies and healthcare providers, which has led to an unprecedented level of investigations, prosecutions, convictions and settlements in the healthcare industry. Dealing with investigations can be time- and resource-consuming. Additionally, if a healthcare company settles an investigation with the DOJ or other law enforcement agencies, the company may be required to agree to additional compliance and reporting requirements as part of a consent decree or corporate integrity agreement.

The U.S. and foreign government regulators have increased regulation, enforcement, inspections and governmental investigations of the medical device industry, including increased U.S. government oversight and enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Whenever a governmental authority concludes that we are not in compliance with applicable laws or regulations, that authority can impose fines, delay or suspend regulatory clearances, institute proceedings to detain or seize our products, issue a recall, impose operating restrictions, enjoin future violations and assess civil penalties against us or our officers or employees and can recommend criminal prosecution. Moreover, governmental authorities can ban or request the recall, repair, replacement or refund of the cost of devices we distribute.

If a governmental authority were to conclude that we are not in compliance with applicable fraud and abuse laws and regulations, we and our officers and employees could be subject to severe penalties including, for example, civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, fines, disgorgement, individual imprisonment, exclusion from participation as a supplier of product to beneficiaries covered by Medicare or Medicaid, additional reporting obligations and oversight if subject to a corporate integrity agreement or other agreement to resolve allegations of non-compliance with these laws, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, and curtailment or restructuring of operations, any of which could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and the results of our operations.

It is uncertain whether and how future legislation, whether domestic or foreign, could affect prospects for QuantaFlo or what actions foreign, federal, state or private payors for health care treatment and services may take in response to any such health care reform proposals or legislation.

Healthcare Reform

Political, economic and regulatory influences are subjecting the healthcare industry to fundamental changes. For example, the Health Care Reform Law significantly changed the health care industry and brought a new way of doing business for providers and health insurance plans.

There have been executive, judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the Health Care Reform Law. For example, President Trump signed several Executive Orders and other directives designed to delay the implementation of certain provisions of the Health Care Reform Law or otherwise circumvent some of the requirements for health insurance mandated by the Health Care Reform Law. Concurrently, Congress considered legislation that would repeal or repeal and replace all or part of the Health Care Reform Law. While Congress has not passed comprehensive repeal legislation, it has enacted laws that modify certain provisions of the Health Care Reform Law such as removing penalties, effective January 1, 2019, for not complying with the Health Care Reform Law’s “individual mandate” to carry health insurance, delaying the implementation of certain Health Care Reform Law-mandated fees, and increasing certain discounts owed by pharmaceutical manufacturers who participate in Medicare Part D. On December 14, 2018, a Texas U.S. District Court Judge ruled that the Health Care Reform Law is unconstitutional in its entirety because the “individual mandate” was repealed by Congress as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Additionally, on December 18, 2019, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit upheld the District Court ruling that the individual mandate was unconstitutional and remanded the case back to the District Court to determine whether the

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remaining provisions of the Health Care Reform Law are invalid as well. The United States Supreme Court is currently reviewing this case, but it is unknown when a decision will be reached. Although the United States Supreme Court has yet ruled on the constitutionality of the Health Care Reform Law, on January 28, 2021, President Biden issued an executive order to initiate a special enrollment period from February 15, 2021 through May 15, 2021 for purposes of obtaining health insurance coverage through the Health Care Reform Law marketplace. The executive order also instructs certain governmental agencies to review and reconsider their existing policies and rules that limit access to healthcare, including among others, reexamining Medicaid demonstration projects and waiver programs that include work requirements, and policies that create unnecessary barriers to obtaining access to health insurance coverage through Medicaid or the Health Care Reform Law. It is unclear how the United States Supreme Court ruling, other such litigation, and the healthcare reform measures of the Biden administration will impact the Health Care Reform Law and our business.

Other legislative changes have been proposed and adopted in the United States since Health Care Reform Law. For example, through the process created by the Budget Control Act of 2011, there are automatic reductions of Medicare payments to providers up to 2% per fiscal year, which went into effect in April 2013 and, following passage of the BBA, will remain in effect through 2030 unless additional Congressional action is taken. However, COVID-19 relief support legislation suspended the 2% Medicare sequester from May 1, 2020 through March 31, 2021.

Additionally, there has been increasing legislative and enforcement interest in the United States with respect to cost-containment initiatives within the health care industry. We cannot predict what healthcare reform initiatives may be adopted in the future, particularly in light of the new presidential administration. Further, it is possible that additional governmental action is taken in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Human Capital Management

As of December 31, 2021, we had 124 employees, all of which were full-time. None of our employees are represented by a labor union, and we consider our relationship with our employees to be positive. We also regularly engage consultants and subcontractors on an as-needed basis. We increased our head count in the fiscal year 2021 from 86 to 124, which represents a 44% increase from the prior year. As we grow our business, we expect to continue to experience growth in the number of our employees, particularly in the areas of sales, marketing, and distribution.

Our human capital resources objectives include, as applicable, identifying, recruiting, retaining, incentivizing and integrating our existing and additional employees. We use different incentive plans such as annual cash bonuses, no-cost healthcare for employees and their families, paid vacation and generous referral bonuses to attract, retain and motivate our employees.

Governance and Culture - Our board of directors, including committees thereof, and executive management team are actively involved in overseeing our employee-related strategies and practices as well as our company culture. Our director of human resources and her team are also actively involved in implementing these decisions. We believe our company culture has been a critical component of our success in attracting and retaining personnel.

Diversity and Inclusion - We aim to create an inclusive working environment where all employees are respected and treated equally. We value diversity of backgrounds and perspectives and our policy is that we do not discriminate based on race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, age, military and veteran status, sexual orientation or any other protected characteristics established by federal, state or local laws. This message is emphasized from the top of our organization down to all of our employees.

Health, Safety and Well-Being - The safety and well-being of our employees is critical to our successful operation. Our health and safety activities are overseen by our board of directors, executive management team and director of human resources. Most of our employees work remotely, with the exception of a few employees who work in the office. These employees are generally in fulfillment and sales support roles. Our human resources department coordinates on-line training programs with the help of outside consultants. We believe that this model of training better fits our business operations and needs.

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Response to COVID-19

As a virtual company, we were better prepared than many at home offices to deal with the effects of the global spread of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Given governmental restrictions mandating “shelter-in-place” or similar limitations, our sales personnel had to eliminate travel, increase the use of our on-line platforms and create new means to replace training methods and hands-on interactions with the customers that we relied on pre-pandemic. To date, we have not terminated any of our employees due to the pandemic. We continue to closely monitor the COVID-19 situation and, if needed, will evolve our plans and policies to keep our employees and customers safe.

ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS

Any investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. Investors should carefully consider the risks described below and all of the information contained in this annual report on Form 10-K before deciding whether to purchase our common stock. Our business, financial condition or results of operations and trading price or value of our securities could be materially adversely affected by these risks if any of them actually occur. This annual report on Form 10-K also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including the risks we face as described below and elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

Risks Related to Our Business

If we do not successfully implement our business strategy, our business and results of operations will be adversely affected.

Our business strategy was formed based on assumptions about the PAD market and healthcare reform that might prove wrong. We believe that various demographics and industry-specific trends, including the aging of the general population, growth of capitated payment programs, numbers of undiagnosed patients with PAD or other diseases and the importance of codifying vascular disease and potentially other diseases will help drive growth in the PAD market and our risk assessment business. However, these demographics and trends, and our assumptions about them, are uncertain. Actual demand for our products and service offerings could differ materially from projected demand if our assumptions regarding these factors prove to be incorrect or do not materialize, or if alternatives to our products or other risk assessment service providers gain widespread acceptance.

In addition, we may not be able to successfully implement our business strategy. To implement our business strategy, we need to (among other things) find new applications for and improve our products and service offerings and educate healthcare providers and plans about the clinical and cost benefits of our products, all of which we believe could increase acceptance of our products by physicians. Although we recently began distributing licenses to Insulin Insights, there is no guarantee that we will be successful or that our customers will be interested in this software, which we view as complementary to QuantaFlo. We also mutually terminated a distribution agreement for a different product line in November 2021, and in the fourth quarter of 2021 wrote down $1.2 million of inventory that we had acquired, as our expectations regarding the marketing and distribution of this product line did not prove to be accurate. We may also need to develop or acquire rights to other products and services that would be of interest to our customers given the patient populations they serve. In addition, we are seeking to increase our sales and, in order to do so, might need to continue to expand our direct and distributor sales forces in existing and new territories, all of which could result in our becoming subject to additional or different regulatory requirements, with which we may not be able to comply. Moreover, even if we successfully implement our business strategy, our operating results may not improve or may decline. We may decide to alter or discontinue aspects of our business strategy and may adopt different strategies due to business or competitive factors not currently foreseen, such as new medical technologies that would make our products obsolete. Our attempts to alter aspects of our business strategy, such as our recent entry into an exclusive marketing and distribution agreement and our investments in private companies, may not yield positive effects on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Any delay or failure to implement our business strategy may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

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Our business has been and could continue to be adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Our business has been and could continue to be adversely affected by the global ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. In the first half of 2020, we experienced decreased test volumes due to "social distancing" and other executive orders mandating "shelter-in-place" or similar restrictions, which limited patient visits by our customers, and restricted participation in trade shows and in-person training, among other items. The testing volume decrease primarily affected revenues from our variable-fee licenses, which are based on usage of our QuantaFlo product, often during home visits by our customers. The extent and duration of the pandemic is unknown, and the future effects on our business are uncertain and difficult to predict. Any future effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, or any similar pandemic, on our business and sales will depend, in part, on the length and severity of any restrictions and limitations on our ability to conduct our business in the ordinary course. These and similar, and perhaps more severe, disruptions in our operations could negatively impact our business, operating results and financial condition.

We currently actively market only one FDA-cleared vascular testing product; vascular testing may not achieve broad market acceptance or be commercially successful. We may also fail to generate meaningful revenues from our exclusive marketing and distribution arrangement, nor benefit from our recent investments in other companies developing complementary products.

We currently actively market only one vascular testing product, QuantaFlo, and have an agreement to exclusively market and distribute Insulin Insights, a new software product line in the United States, including Puerto Rico, for which we are developing a marketing plan. We also have a minority investment in another company, NeuroDiagnostics Inc., doing business as SYNAPS Dx, which is developing an additional potentially complementary product offering, Discern, although such product is in early stages and may not ultimately fit with our strategy and customer base. Accordingly, we expect that revenues from our vascular testing product will account for the vast majority of our revenues for at least the next several years. Our vascular testing product, and any other products we may offering the future, may not gain broad market acceptance unless we continue to educate physicians and plans of its benefits. Moreover, even if insurance plans, home health care providers and physicians understand the benefits of vascular and other risk assessment testing, they still may elect not to use our products for a variety of reasons, such as familiarity with other devices and approaches. We may not be successful in gaining market acceptance of a technique measuring comparative blood flows using our proprietary algorithm to indicate flow obstruction as opposed to existing techniques that measure comparative blood pressures using well-accepted criteria to indicate flow obstruction, or imaging techniques that visualize anatomy of the arteries. Providers may also object to renting an examining tool with on-going monthly payments rather than making a one-time capital purchase or be reluctant to pay monthly fees for tools in the examining room when they have many such tools, such as thermometer and stethoscope that only required one-time minimal purchases.

If our vascular testing product, QuantaFlo, our diabetes software, Insulin Insights, or other products we may offer are not viewed as an attractive alternative to other products, procedures and techniques, we will not achieve significant market penetration or be able to generate significant revenues. To the extent that any products we offer are not commercially successful or are withdrawn from the market for any reason, our revenues will be adversely impacted, and our business, operating results and financial condition will be harmed.

Physicians and other customers may not widely adopt our products unless they determine, based on experience, long-term clinical data and published peer reviewed journal articles, that the use of our products provides a safe and effective alternative to other existing ABI devices.

We believe that physicians and other customers will not widely adopt our vascular testing product or our other products in development or products we distribute unless they determine, based on experience, long-term clinical data and published peer reviewed journal articles, that the use of such product provides a safe and effective alternative to other existing ABI devices.

We cannot provide any assurance that the data collected from our past, current and any future clinical trials will be sufficient to demonstrate that our products are an attractive alternative to other ABI devices or procedures. If we fail to demonstrate safety and efficacy that is at least comparable to other ABI devices that are available on the market, our ability to successfully market our products will be significantly limited. Even if the data collected from clinical studies or

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clinical experience indicate positive results, each physician’s actual experience with our products will vary. We also believe that published peer-reviewed journal articles and recommendations and support by influential physicians regarding our vascular testing product and our other products in development will be important for market acceptance and adoption, and we cannot assure you that we will receive these recommendations and support, or that supportive articles will be published. Accordingly, there is a risk that our products may not be adopted by many physicians, which would negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Moreover, we recently acquired exclusive distribution rights to a new product area and may in the future acquire rights to other complementary products. If we are not able to convince potential customers of their benefits, these rights and potential future rights may not generate any meaningful revenues for our company.

If healthcare providers are unable to obtain adequate coverage and reimbursement either for procedures performed using our product or patient care incorporating the use of our product, it is unlikely that our product will gain widespread acceptance.

Maintaining and growing revenues from our products and service offerings depends on the availability of coverage and adequate reimbursement from third-party payors, including government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, private insurance plans and managed care programs. Healthcare providers that use medical devices such as our vascular testing product to test their patients generally rely on third-party payors to pay for all or part of the costs and fees associated with the procedures performed with these devices, or to compensate them for their patient care services. The existence of coverage and adequate reimbursement for the procedures or patient care performed with our vascular testing product by third-party payors is central to the acceptance of our vascular testing product and any future products. During the past several years, third-party payors have undertaken cost-containment initiatives including different payment methods, monitoring healthcare expenditures, and anti-fraud initiatives. We may not be able to achieve or maintain profitability if third-party payors deny coverage or reduce their current levels of payment, or if our costs of production increase faster than increases in reimbursement levels. Further, many private payors use coverage decisions and payment amounts determined by CMS, which administers the Medicare program, as guidelines in setting their coverage and reimbursement policies. Future action by CMS or other government agencies may diminish payments to physicians, outpatient centers and/or hospitals. Those private payors that do not follow the Medicare guidelines may adopt different coverage and reimbursement policies for procedures or patient care performed with our vascular testing product. For some governmental programs, such as Medicaid, coverage and reimbursement differ from state to state, and some state Medicaid programs may not pay an adequate amount for the procedures or patient care performed with our vascular testing product if any payment is made at all. As the portion of the U.S. population over the age of 65 and eligible for Medicare continues to grow, we may be more vulnerable to coverage and reimbursement limitations imposed by CMS. Furthermore, the healthcare industry in the United States has experienced a trend toward cost containment as government and private insurers seek to control healthcare costs by imposing lower payment rates and negotiating reduced contract rates with service providers. Therefore, we cannot be certain that the procedures or patient care performed with our product will be reimbursed at a cost-effective level.

Our vascular testing product is generally but not specifically approved for reimbursement under any third-party payor codes; if third-party payors refuse to reimburse our customers for their use of our product, it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our vascular testing product is licensed by healthcare providers. They may bill various third-party payors, including governmental healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, private insurance plans and managed care programs for procedures in which our vascular testing product is used. Reimbursement is a significant factor considered by healthcare providers in determining whether to license medical devices or systems such as our vascular testing product. We cannot control whether or not providers who use our vascular testing product will seek reimbursement. Therefore, our ability to successfully commercialize our vascular testing product could depend on the coverage and adequacy of reimbursement from these third-party payors.

Currently, our vascular testing product is generally but not specifically approved for any particular reimbursement code. Although most of our customers report being covered and reimbursed by third-party payors consistently for procedures using a variety of different reimbursement codes, there is a risk that third-party payors may disagree with the

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reimbursement under a particular code. In addition, some potential customers have deferred renting our product given the uncertainty regarding reimbursement. We do not track denial of requests for reimbursement made by the users of our product. It is our belief that such denials have occurred and might occur in the future with more or less frequency. Even if our product and procedures are often currently covered and reimbursed by third-party payors and Medicare, problems for customers to receive reimbursement or adverse changes in payors’ coverage and reimbursement policies that affect our product could harm our ability to market our vascular testing product. Obtaining approval for a particular reimbursement code is time consuming and can be costly. Accordingly, at this time, and given the way we intend our vascular testing product to be used, we do not intend to pursue formal approval for our vascular testing product for any particular code.

Moreover, we are unable to predict what changes will be made to the reimbursement methodologies used by third-party payors. We cannot be certain that under current and future payment systems, in which healthcare providers may be reimbursed a set amount based on the type of procedure performed, such as those utilized by Medicare and in many privately managed care systems, the cost of our product will be justified and incorporated into the overall cost of the procedure.

We rely heavily upon the talents of a small number of key personnel, the loss of whom could severely damage our business.

Our performance depends to a large extent on a small number of key scientific, technical, managerial and marketing personnel. We do not maintain key man insurance for any of our personnel. The loss of the services of any of these key personnel could still severely damage our business prospects, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We rely on a small number of employees in our direct sales force and face challenges and risk in managing and maintaining our distribution network and the parties who make up that network.

We face significant challenges and risks in managing our distribution network and retaining the parties who make up that network. We had 85 sales and marketing employees as of December 31, 2021. If any of our sales or marketing force were to resign, or if our co-exclusive distributor were to cease to do business with us, our sales could be adversely affected. Our co-exclusive distributor accounted for less than 3% of our revenues for each of the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020. We may need to seek out alternatives, such as increasing our direct sales and marketing force or contracting with external independent sales representatives or enter another distributor relationship. There is no guarantee that we would be successful in our efforts to find independent sales representatives or another large distributor, or that we would be able to negotiate contract terms favorable to us. Failure to hire or retain qualified direct sales and marketing personnel or independent distributors would prevent us from expanding our business and generating revenues, which would have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve or maintain profitability.

To adequately commercialize our products and any new products we add, we may need to increase our sales and marketing network, which will require us to hire, train, retain and supervise employees and other independent contractors.

We are currently exploring other sales models to generate revenues from our products in addition to the leasing model, such as our fee per test model. We also have exclusive distribution rights to a new product area and may in the future acquire rights to other complementary products. As we increase our marketing efforts to pursue these new strategies and expand our efforts to target insurance plans that serve Medicare Advantage members, we may need to increase our sales and marketing network. Our future success will depend largely on our ability to continue to hire, train, retain and motivate skilled direct sales representatives, independent sales representatives or distributors with significant technical knowledge about our product, in addition to coordinating networks of contract medical assistants and other personnel to staff health and wellness fairs and physicians’ offices in fee-for-service models. New hires and independent contractors require training, supervision and take time to achieve full productivity. If we fail to train and supervise new hires adequately, or if we experience high turnover in our sales force or trained professionals in the future, we cannot be certain that we will maintain or increase our sales. If we are unable to expand our sales and marketing capabilities, we

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may not be able to effectively commercialize our vascular testing product or our other products and service offerings in development, which would adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We do not require our customers to enter into long-term licenses or maintenance contracts for our products or services and may therefore lose customers on short notice.

Our business is primarily based on a leasing model rather than an outright sale of our products. Our pricing is based on data collected on use rates and third-party payment rates to physicians and facilities for the use of our product. We require no down payment, long-term commitment or maintenance contract or fees from our customers and replace damaged products free of charge in the service model. If we lose current customers on short notice, we may not be able to find new customers to replace them with in a timely manner and that could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, our business model of replacing damaged products free of charge may prove to be costly and affect the profitability of our service model.

We are exposed to risk as a significant portion of our revenues and accounts receivables are with a limited number of customers.

A limited number of customers account for a significant portion of our revenues and accounts receivable. For the year ended December 31, 2021, two customers accounted for 40.8%, and 28.6% of our revenues, and as of December 31, 2021, three customers accounted for 21.9%, 20.1% and 16.6% of our accounts receivable. If our largest customers were to cease using or stop payment for our vascular testing devices, it would have a material adverse effect on our revenues and/or our accounts receivable. Our efforts to diversify and potentially expand our product offering such as by distributing licenses to Insulin Insights, are preliminary in nature. This concentration of revenues and accounts receivable among a limited number of customers represents a significant risk.

We rely on a small number of independent suppliers and facilities for the manufacturing of our vascular testing product. Any delay or disruption in the supply of the product or facility may negatively impact our operations.

We manufacture our vascular testing product through a small number of independent contractors based in the United States. We also purchase inventory under our exclusive marketing and distribution agreement in a new product area. The loss or disruption of our relationships with outside vendors and suppliers could subject us to substantial delays in the delivery to customers. Our current contractor manufacturers source some supplies from China and should these outside vendors encounter issues due to supply chain disruptions as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic or otherwise, we believe alternative suppliers should be available. However, significant delays in the delivery of our product or inventory to us could result in possible cancellation of orders and the loss of customers. Although we expect our vendors and suppliers to comply with our contract terms, we do not have control over such parties. Our inability to provide a product that meets delivery schedules could have a material adverse effect on our reputation in the industry, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Further, our vascular testing product is manufactured in the United States in a limited number of facilities. If an event occurred that resulted in material damage to these manufacturing facilities or our manufacturing contractors lacked sufficient labor to fully operate their facilities, we may be unable to transfer the manufacture of our vascular testing product to another facility or location in a cost-effective or timely manner, if at all. This potential inability to transfer production could occur for a number of reasons, including but not limited to a lack of necessary relevant manufacturing capability at another facility, or the regulatory requirements of the FDA or other governmental regulatory bodies. Even if there are many qualified contract manufacturers available around the country and our product is relatively easy to manufacture, such an event could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Because we operate in an industry with significant product liability risk, and we may not be sufficiently insured against this risk, we may be subject to substantial claims against our product or services that we may provide.

The development, manufacture and sale, lease or use of products or provision of services in a medical setting entails significant risks of product liability or other negligence or malpractice claims. Although we maintain insurance to cover us in the event of liability claims, and as of the date of this this annual report on Form 10-K, no such claims have been asserted or threatened against us, our insurance may not be sufficient to cover all possible future liabilities regarding our product, or from performing tests with our product or other non-proprietary products. Accordingly, we may not be adequately protected from any liabilities, including any adverse judgments or settlements, we might incur in connection with the development, clinical testing, manufacture and sale, lease or use of our products or the provision of services. A successful product liability or negligence or medical malpractice claim or series of claims brought against us that result in an adverse judgment against or settlement by us in excess of any insurance coverage could seriously harm our financial condition or reputation. Moreover, even if no judgments, fines, damages or liabilities are imposed on us, our reputation could suffer, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, product liability and other malpractice insurance is expensive and may not always be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all.

We may implement a product recall or voluntary market withdrawal or stop shipment of our product due to product defects or product enhancements and modifications, which would significantly increase our costs.

The manufacturing and marketing of our vascular testing product and any future products that we may develop involves an inherent risk that our products may prove to be defective. In that event, we may voluntarily implement a recall or market withdrawal or stop shipment or may be required to do so by a regulatory authority. A recall of our vascular testing product or one of our future products, or a similar product manufactured by another manufacturer, could impair sales of the products we market as a result of confusion concerning the scope of the recall or as a result of the damage to our reputation for quality and safety. Further any product recall, voluntary market withdrawal or shipment stoppage of our product could significantly increase our costs and have a material adverse effect on our business.

If we fail to properly manage our anticipated growth, our business could suffer.

Our growth has placed, and will continue to place, a significant strain on our management and on our operational and financial resources and systems. Failure to manage our growth effectively could cause us to over-invest or under-invest and result in losses or weaknesses. Additionally, our anticipated growth will increase the demands placed on our supplier, resulting in an increased need for us to carefully monitor for quality assurance. Any failure by us to manage our growth effectively could have an adverse effect on our ability to achieve our development and commercialization goals.

An information security incident, including a cybersecurity breach, could have a negative impact on our business or reputation.

To meet business objectives, we rely on both internal information technology systems and networks, and those of third parties and their vendors, to process and store sensitive data, including confidential research and patient data that may be subject to legal protection. The extensive information security and cybersecurity threats, which affect companies globally, pose a risk to the security and availability of these information technology systems and networks, and the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of our sensitive data. We continually assess these threats and make investments to increase internal protection, detection, and response capabilities, as well as ensure our third-party providers have required capabilities and controls, to address this risk. To date, we have not experienced any material impact to our business or operations resulting from information or cybersecurity attacks; however, because of the frequently changing attack techniques, along with the increased volume and sophistication of the attacks, there is the potential for us to be adversely impacted. This impact could result in reputational, competitive, operational or other business harm as well as financial costs and regulatory action.

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Fluctuations in insurance cost and availability could adversely affect our profitability or our risk management profile.

We hold a number of insurance policies, including product liability insurance, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, and workers’ compensation insurance. If the costs of maintaining adequate insurance coverage increase significantly in the future, our operating results could be materially adversely affected. Likewise, if any of our current insurance coverage should become unavailable to us or become economically impractical, we would be required to operate our business without indemnity from commercial insurance providers. If we operate our business without insurance, we could be responsible for paying claims or judgments against us that would have otherwise been covered by insurance, which could adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition.

We will need to generate significant revenues to remain profitable.

We intend to increase our operating expenses substantially as we add sales and technical support representatives to increase our geographic coverage, increase our marketing capabilities, pursue research and new product and service offering development and increase our general and administrative functions to support our growing operations. We will need to generate significant sales to maintain profitability and we might not be able to do so. Even if we do generate significant sales, we might not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis in the future. If our sales grow more slowly than we anticipate or if our operating expenses exceed our expectations, our financial performance will likely be adversely affected.

Our future financial performance will depend in part on the successful improvements and software updates to our vascular testing product on a cost-effective basis.

Our future financial performance will depend in part on our ability to influence, anticipate, identify and respond to changing consumer preferences and needs and the technologies relating to the care and treatment of vascular problems. We can provide no assurances that our vascular testing product will achieve significant commercial success and that it will gain meaningful market share. We may not correctly anticipate or identify trends in consumer preferences or needs or may identify them later than competitors do. In addition, difficulties in manufacturing or in obtaining regulatory approvals may delay or prohibit improvements to our vascular testing product or our other products in development. Further, we may not be able to develop improvements and software updates to our vascular testing product at a cost that allows us to meet our goals for profitability. Service costs relating to our product may be greater than anticipated, rentals may be returned prior to the end of the license term, and we may be required to devote significant resources to address any quality issues associated with our vascular testing product.

Failure to successfully introduce improve or update our products on a cost-effective basis, or delays in customer decisions related to the evaluation of our products could cause us to lose market acceptance and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We operate in an intensely competitive and rapidly changing business environment, and there is a substantial risk our products or service offerings could become obsolete or uncompetitive.

The market for medical systems, equipment and other devices and services is highly competitive. We compete with many medical service companies in the United States and internationally in connection with our vascular testing product and products under development. We face competition from numerous companies in the diagnostic area, as well as competition from academic institutions, government agencies and research institutions. Most of our current and potential competitors have, and will continue to have, substantially greater financial, technological, research and development, regulatory and clinical, manufacturing, marketing and sales, distribution and personnel resources than we do. There can be no assurance that we will have sufficient resources to successfully commercialize our vascular testing product or any other future products, if and when they are approved for sale or license, or service offerings that we may develop. Our future success will depend largely upon our ability to anticipate and keep pace with developments and advances. Current or future competitors could develop alternative technologies or products or service offerings that are more effective, easier to use or more economical than what we or any potential licensee develop. If our technologies or products or service offerings become obsolete or uncompetitive, our related revenues would decrease. This would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

One of our business strategies is developing additional products and service offerings that allow healthcare providers to deliver cost-effective wellness and receive increased compensation for their services. The development of new products and service offerings involves time and expense and we may never realize the benefits of this investment.

As part of our business strategy, we intend to develop additional products and service offerings that allow healthcare providers to deliver cost-effective wellness and receive increased compensation for their services. Such product and service offering development may require substantial investments and we may commit significant resources and time before knowing whether our efforts will translate into profits for our company. We may continue to choose to invest some of our cash resources in other entities that may have complementary technologies or product offerings and may not realize the benefit of such investments. For example, in November 2021 we mutually terminated a distribution agreement for a product line and wrote down $1.2 million of inventory. It is possible that our development efforts will not be successful and that we will not be able to develop new products or service offerings, either alone or in partnership with others, or if developed that we will obtain the necessary regulatory approvals for commercialization. Even if we receive necessary regulatory approvals, there is no guarantee that such approved products or any new service offerings will achieve market acceptance and we may never realize the benefits of any investment in this strategy.

We may not realize expected benefits from our investments in other companies, which could harm our business.

From time to time, we may decide to invest in other companies with potentially complementary products or technologies. For example, in September and October 2020, we made investments in two private companies working in other product areas, Discern and Insulin Insights (for which we now have an exclusive distribution agreement). There can be no assurance that the businesses we invest in will become profitable or remain so or that we will realize any financial benefit from our investments, including whether or not we will distribute Discern or realize any benefits from our efforts to distribute Insulin Insights. Additionally, investments in privately held companies are inherently risky, in some instances because the markets for the technologies or products these companies have under development may never materialize or achieve expectations. If these companies do not succeed, we may be forced to record impairment charges and could lose some or all of our investment in these companies. Further, we may need to divest our investments or increase our investment to become a controlling interest sooner than we may like in order to comply with regulations regarding the amount of our assets represented by minority investments. These regulatory requirements may not always coincide with our business objectives and could adversely affect our investments and strategy.

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Risks Related to Our Legal and Regulatory Environment

Our business is subject to many laws and government regulations governing the manufacture and sale of medical devices, including the FDA’s 510(k) clearance process, and laws and regulations governing patient data and information, among others.

Our vascular testing product and any future medical devices that we may develop or services that we may offer are subject to extensive regulation in the United States by the federal government, including by the FDA. For a discussion of the relevant regulatory regime, see “Business—Government Regulation.” We cannot assure that any new medical devices or new uses or modifications for our vascular testing product that we develop will be cleared or approved in a timely or cost-effective manner, if cleared or approved at all. Even if such clearances or approvals are received, they may not be for all indications. Because medical devices may only be marketed for cleared or approved indications, this could significantly limit the market for that product and may adversely affect our results of operations.

Furthermore, although QuantaFlo has received FDA clearance, we must make our own determination regarding whether a modification to the device requires a new clearance. We cannot guarantee that the FDA will agree with our decisions not to seek clearances for particular device modifications or that we will be successful in obtaining 510(k) clearances for modifications. Any such additional clearance processes with the FDA could delay our ability to market a modified product and may adversely affect our results of operations.

The FDA may change its policies, adopt additional regulations, or revise existing regulations, in particular relating to the 510(k) clearance process.

The FDA may change its policies, adopt additional regulations, or revise existing regulations, each of which could prevent or delay pre-market approval or 510(k) clearance of a device, or could impact our ability to market our currently cleared device. Future reforms could require us to file new 510(k) clearances and could increase the total number of 510(k) clearance to be filed. We cannot predict what effect these reforms will have on our ability to obtain 510(k) clearances in a timely manner. We also cannot predict the nature of other regulatory reforms and their resulting effects on our business.

Our business is subject to unannounced inspections by FDA to determine our compliance with FDA requirements.

FDA inspections can result in inspectional observations on FDA’s Form-483, warning letters or other forms of more significant enforcement action. More specifically, if FDA concludes that we are not in compliance with applicable laws or regulations, or that our vascular testing product or any future medical device we develop is ineffective or pose an unreasonable health risk, the FDA could:

require us to notify health professionals and others that our devices present unreasonable risk of substantial harm to public health;
order us to recall, repair, replace or refund the cost of any medical device that we manufactured or distributed;
detain, seize or ban adulterated or misbranded medical devices;
refuse to provide us with documents necessary to export our product;
refuse requests for 510(k) clearance or pre-market approval of new products or new intended uses;
withdraw 510(k) clearances that are already granted;
impose operating restrictions, including requiring a partial or total shutdown of production;
enjoin or restrain conduct resulting in violations of applicable law pertaining to medical devices; and/or

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assess criminal or civil penalties against our officers, employees or us.

If the FDA concludes that we failed to comply with any regulatory requirement during an inspection, it could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition. We could incur substantial expense and harm to our reputation, and our ability to introduce new or enhanced products in a timely manner could be adversely affected.

Although part of our business strategy is based on payment provisions enacted under government healthcare reform, we also face significant uncertainty in the industry regarding the implementation, transformation or repeal and replacement of the Health Care Reform Law.

Political, economic and regulatory influences are subjecting the healthcare industry to fundamental changes. For example, the Health Care Reform Law brought a new way of doing business for providers and health insurance plans, shifting the focus from fee for service programs to capitated programs that pay a monthly fee per patient. The Health Care Reform law also provided for higher risk factor adjustment payments for sicker patients who have conditions that are codified, as well as economic benefits for achieving certain quality of care measurements. For a discussion of healthcare reform activity, see “Business—Government Regulation—Healthcare Reform.”

We believe that the Health Care Reform Law measures are mainly positive for our business given the ability of our vascular testing product to measure blood flow in an in-office setting, which can assist doctors and other providers to suspect PAD and other vascular diseases. However, we cannot predict what changes will now be made, and if these features will be repealed. If changes are made to the Health Care Reform Law, or it is repealed altogether without a comparable replacement, such that there are no incentives for identifying sicker patients, it would negatively affect our business prospects and strategy, and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Further, the Health Care Reform Law encourages hospitals and physicians to work collaboratively through shared savings programs, such as accountable care organizations, as well as other bundled payment initiatives, which may ultimately result in the reduction of medical device acquisitions and the consolidation of medical device suppliers used by hospitals. Changes to or repeal of the Health Care Reform Law could adversely affect our financial results and business.

The applicable healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations, along with the increased enforcement environment, may lead to an enforcement action targeting us, which could adversely affect our business.

We are subject to various healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations, as described “Business—Government Regulation—Healthcare Fraud and Abuse.” We may be subject to liability under such laws and may also be subject to liability for any future conduct that is deemed by the government or the courts to violate these laws, including significant administrative, criminal and civil penalties, damages, fines, disgorgement, imprisonment, exclusion from participation as a supplier of product to beneficiaries covered by Medicare or Medicaid, additional reporting obligations and oversight if subject to a corporate integrity agreement or other agreement to resolve allegations of non-compliance with these laws, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, and curtailment or restructuring of operations.

Additionally, the government has continued to pursue an increasing number of enforcement actions. This increased enforcement environment may increase scrutiny of us, directly or indirectly, and could increase the likelihood of an enforcement action targeting us. We have entered into a supply and distribution agreement with Bard. These customers include parties that bill Federal healthcare programs for use of our product, all of whom may be subject to government scrutiny. Finally, to the extent that any of the agreements are breached or terminated, our business may experience a decrease in revenues. In addition, to the extent that our customers, many of whom are providers, may be affected by this increased enforcement environment, our business could correspondingly be affected. It is possible that a review of our business practices or those of our customers by courts or government authorities could result in a determination with an adverse effect on our business. We cannot predict the effect of possible future enforcement actions on our business.

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Changes in, or interpretations of, tax rules and regulations may adversely affect our effective tax rates.

We are subject to income and other taxes in the United States. Significant judgment is required in evaluating our provision for income taxes or in claiming tax credits or taking other tax positions. During the ordinary course of business, there are many transactions for which the ultimate tax determination is uncertain or if we were to be audited, the Internal Revenue Service may not agree with our tax positions. For example, there could be changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities or changes in the relevant tax, accounting, and other laws, regulations, principles and interpretations. Although we believe our tax estimates and practices are reasonable, the final determination of tax audits and any related litigation could be materially different from our historical income tax provisions and accruals. The results of an audit or litigation, or the effects of a change in tax policy in the United States, could have a material effect on our operating results in the period or periods for which that determination is made. In addition, new income, sales, use or other tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be enacted at any time, which could affect the tax treatment of our earnings. Any new taxes could adversely affect our business operations, and our business and financial performance. Further, existing tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be interpreted, changed, modified or applied adversely to us.

Our ability to use NOL, carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be subject to limitations.

As of December 31, 2021, we had federal NOL carryforwards of $106,000. These NOL carryforwards, to the extent they arose prior to 2018, could expire unused and be unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities. Federal NOLs incurred in 2018 and in future years may be carried forward indefinitely, but the deductibility of such federal NOLs is limited. In addition, under Section 382 of the Code, and corresponding provisions of state law, if a corporation undergoes an “ownership change,” which is generally defined as a greater than 50% change, by value, in its equity ownership over a three-year period, the corporation’s ability to use its pre-change NOL carryforwards and other pre-change tax attributes to offset its post-change income or taxes may be limited. We have completed a formal Code Section 382 study for the period January 1, 2012 through June 30, 2019 and we believe an ownership change has occurred. In addition, we may experience ownership changes in the future as a result of subsequent shifts in our stock ownership, some of which may be outside of our control. If an ownership change occurs and our ability to use our NOL carryforwards is materially limited, it would harm our future operating results by effectively increasing our future tax obligations.

We have had material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. Although we have remedied our prior material weaknesses, if we identify additional material weaknesses in the future, or if our former material weaknesses recur, it could have an adverse effect on our company.

In prior years, we have identified certain material weaknesses in connection with management’s evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting that we have remedied. These weaknesses have included issues arising from our size and inability to segregate duties; ineffective design of certain of our information technology and change management controls; insufficient controls to validate the completeness and accuracy of underlying data; insufficient protocols and procedures to retain adequate documentary evidence related to the timely review and approval of manual journal entries and those supporting the design and operating effectiveness of certain important management review controls; a lack of controls to identify and analyze related party transactions; a lack of technical accounting competence; and inadequate procedures and controls to appropriately comply with, and account for, certain payroll tax withholdings and related expenses.

Although we have remedied our prior material weaknesses, we cannot assure you that we have identified all material weaknesses or that we will not in the future have additional, or recurrence of our prior, material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. If we have additional material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting in the future, or if our former material weaknesses recur, it could have an adverse effect on our company.

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Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

Our success largely depends on our ability to obtain and protect the proprietary information on which we base our product.

Our success depends in large part upon our ability to establish and maintain the proprietary nature of our technology through the patent process, as well as our ability to license from others’ patents and patent applications necessary to develop our product. If our patent or any future patents are successfully challenged, invalidated or circumvented, or our right or ability to manufacture our product was to be limited, our ability to continue to manufacture and market our product could be adversely affected. In addition to patents, we rely on trade secrets and proprietary know-how, which we seek to protect, in part, through confidentiality and proprietary information agreements. The other parties to these agreements may breach these provisions, and we may not have adequate remedies for any breach. Additionally, our trade secrets could otherwise become known to or be independently developed by competitors.

As of December 31, 2021, we have been issued, or have rights to, one U.S. patent. The patent we hold may be successfully challenged, invalidated or circumvented, or we may otherwise be unable to rely on this patent. These risks are also present for the process we use for manufacturing our product. In addition, our competitors, many of whom have substantial resources and have made substantial investments in competing technologies, may apply for and obtain patents that prevent, limit or interfere with our ability to make, use and sell our product, either in the United States or in international markets. The medical device industry has been characterized by extensive litigation regarding patents and other intellectual property rights. We may institute, become party to, or be threatened with, future adversarial proceedings or litigation regarding intellectual property rights with respect to our product and technology, including interference or derivation proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO. Third parties may assert infringement claims against us based on existing patents or patents that may be granted in the future. If we are found to infringe a third party’s intellectual property rights, we could be required to obtain a license from such third party to continue developing and marketing our product and technology. However, we may not be able to obtain any required license on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Even if we were able to obtain a license, it could be non-exclusive, thereby giving our competitors access to the same technologies licensed to us. We could be forced, including by court order, to cease commercializing the infringing technology or product. In addition, we could be found liable for monetary damages, including treble damages and attorneys’ fees if we are found to have willfully infringed a patent. A finding of infringement could prevent us from commercializing our product or force us to cease some of our business operations, which could materially harm our business. Claims that we have misappropriated the confidential information or trade secrets of third parties could have a similar negative impact on our business. The defense and prosecution of intellectual property suits, USPTO proceedings and related legal and administrative proceedings are both costly and time consuming. Any litigation or interference proceedings involving us may require us to incur substantial legal and other fees and expenses and may require some of our employees to devote all or a substantial portion of their time to the proceedings.

We may need to license intellectual property from third parties, and such licenses may not be available or may not be available on commercially reasonable terms.

A third party may hold intellectual property, including patent rights that are important or necessary to the development of our vascular testing product or any future products. It may be necessary for us to use the patented or proprietary technology of a third party to commercialize our own technology or products, in which case we would be required to obtain a license from such third party. A license to such intellectual property may not be available or may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

We may be subject to claims by third parties asserting that our employees or we have misappropriated their intellectual property, or claiming ownership of what we regard as our own intellectual property.

Although we try to ensure that we and our employees and independent contractors do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or that these employees or independent contractors have used or disclosed intellectual property in violation of the rights of others. These claims

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may cover a range of matters, such as challenges to our trademarks, as well as claims that our employees or independent contractors are using trade secrets or other proprietary information of any such employee’s former employer or independent contractors. Although we do not expect the resolution of the proceeding to have a material adverse effect on our business or financial condition, litigation to defend ourselves against claims can be both costly and time consuming, and divert management’s attention away from growing our business.

In addition, while it is our policy to require our employees and independent contractors who may be involved in the development of intellectual property to execute agreements assigning such intellectual property to us, we may be unsuccessful in executing such an agreement with each party who in fact develops intellectual property that we regard as our own. Our and their assignment agreements may not be self-executing or may be breached, and we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defend claims they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property.

If we fail in prosecuting or defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in prosecuting or defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position would be harmed.

In addition to seeking patents for some of our technology and product, we also rely on trade secrets, including unpatented know-how, technology and other proprietary information, to maintain our competitive position. We seek to protect these trade secrets, in part, by entering into non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements with parties who have access to them, such as our employees, corporate collaborators, outside scientific collaborators, contract manufacturers, consultants, advisors and other third parties. We also generally enter into confidentiality and invention or patent assignment agreements with our employees and consultants. Despite these efforts, any of these parties may breach the agreements and disclose our proprietary information, including our trade secrets, and we may not be able to obtain adequate remedies for such breaches. Enforcing a claim that a party infringed a patent or illegally disclosed or misappropriated a trade secret is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, some courts inside and outside the United States are less willing or unwilling to protect trade secrets. If any of our trade secrets were to be lawfully obtained or independently developed by a competitor, we would have no right to prevent them, or those to whom they communicate it, from using that technology or information to compete with us. If any of our trade secrets were to be disclosed to or independently developed by a competitor, our competitive position would be harmed.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

Our executive officers, directors and significant stockholders, if they choose to act together, have the ability to control all matters submitted to stockholders for approval.

Our executive officers, directors and significant stockholders beneficially own in the aggregate shares representing approximately 55.9% of our common stock as of February 25, 2022. If these stockholders choose to act together, they are able to control all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, as well as our management and affairs. For example, these persons, if they choose to act together, can control the election of directors and approval of any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. This concentration of ownership control may:

delay, defer or prevent a change in control;
entrench our management and the board of directors; or
impede a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination involving us that other stockholders may desire.

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Provisions in our corporate charter documents and under Delaware law could make an acquisition of our company, which may be beneficial to our stockholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

Provisions in our corporate charter and our bylaws may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control of our company that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which you might otherwise receive a premium for your shares. These provisions could also limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock, thereby depressing the market price of our common stock. In addition, because our board of directors is responsible for appointing the members of our management team, these provisions may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our board of directors. Among other things, these provisions:

allow the authorized number of our directors to be changed only by resolution of our board of directors;
allow for a classified board of directors;
establish advance notice requirements for stockholders proposal that can be acted on at stockholder meeting and nominations to our board of directors; and
limit who may call stockholder meetings.

Moreover, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which prohibits a person who owns in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock from merging or combining with us for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person acquired in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock, unless the merger or combination is approved in a prescribed manner.

Our amended and restated bylaws designate exclusive forums for the adjudication of certain disputes, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to bring claims in a judicial forum it finds favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers, or employees.

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that a state or federal court located within the State of Delaware is the sole and exclusive forum for:

any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf;
any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any director, officer or other employee or stockholder of our company to us or our stockholders;
any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware, our charter or our bylaws, as to which the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware confers jurisdiction on the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware; and
any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine.

Our amended and restated bylaws further provide that a federal district court of the United State is the sole and exclusive forum for any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. These provisions further provide that any person or entity that acquires any interest in shares of our capital stock will be deemed to have notice of and consented to these provisions.

These provisions may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers, or other employees, which may discourage lawsuits against us and our

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directors, officers, and other employees. If a court were to find any of these provisions to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving the dispute in other jurisdictions, which could seriously harm our business.

The price of our common stock may be volatile and fluctuate substantially, which could result in substantial losses for purchasers of our common stock.

Our stock price has been and is likely to continue to be volatile. The stock market in general and the market for smaller medical device companies in particular have experienced extreme volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. As a result of this volatility, you may not be able to sell your common stock. The market price for our common stock may be influenced by many factors, including:

the success of competitive products, services or technologies;
regulatory or legal developments in the United States and other countries;
developments or disputes concerning patent applications, issued patents or other proprietary rights;
the recruitment or departure of key personnel;
actual or anticipated changes in estimates as to financial results, development timelines or recommendations by securities analysts;
variations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;
changes in the structure of healthcare payment systems;
market conditions in the medical device sector;
general economic, industry and market conditions; and
the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. Due to the potential volatility of our stock price, we may be the target of securities litigation in the future. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources from our business.

Because we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our capital stock in the foreseeable future, capital appreciation, if any, will be your sole source of gain.

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our capital stock. We anticipate that we will retain our earnings, if any, for future growth and therefore do not anticipate paying cash dividends in the future. As a result, only appreciation of the price of our common stock will provide a return to stockholders.

General Risk Factors

We are currently a “smaller reporting company,” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to such companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are a “smaller reporting company,” as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and will remain a smaller reporting company for so long as either our annual revenues are less than $100.0 million during the most recently completed fiscal year and our voting and non-voting common stock held by non-

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affiliates is less than $700.0 million measured on the last business day of our second fiscal quarter, or our annual revenues are greater than $100.0 million during the most recently completed fiscal year and our voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates is less than $250.0 million measured on the last business day of our second fiscal quarter. For so long as we remain a smaller reporting company, we are permitted and intend to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not smaller reporting companies. These exemptions include:

being permitted to provide only two years of audited financial statements, in addition to any required unaudited interim financial statements, with correspondingly reduced “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” disclosure; and
reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation.

We have taken advantage of reduced reporting burdens in this annual report on Form 10-K. We cannot predict whether investors will find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

We have incurred and will continue to incur increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management has been and will continue to be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives and corporate governance practices.

As a public company, we have incurred and will continue to incur increased costs, and our management has been and will continue to be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives and corporate governance practices. Moreover, after we are no longer a smaller reporting company, we will incur additional significant legal, accounting and other expenses to address compliance and corporate governance. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and other applicable securities rules and regulations impose various requirements on public companies, including establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls and corporate governance practices. Our management and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, the currently applicable rules and regulations have already increased our legal and financial compliance costs and made some activities more time-consuming and costly. We will need to continue to dedicate internal resources, potentially engage outside consultants and continue steps to improve control processes as appropriate, validate through testing that controls are functioning as documented and implement a continuous reporting and improvement process for internal control over financial reporting

You may experience future dilution as a result of future equity offerings.

In order to raise additional capital or pursue strategic acquisition opportunities, we may in the future offer additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock. We cannot assure you that we will be able to sell shares or other securities in any other offering at a price per share that is equal to or greater than the price per share paid by investors in such an offering, and investors purchasing shares or other securities in the future could have rights superior to existing stockholders.

The price per share at which we sell or issue additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock in future transactions may be higher or lower than the price at which you purchased your shares.

ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

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ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES

Because we outsource our manufacturing to “turn-key” manufacturers and have a geographically dispersed sales force and distributor arrangement, we have minimal needs for office space to conduct our day-to-day business operations. Our headquarters are located in Santa Clara, CA, where we lease an operations fulfillment space that also serves as our corporate headquarters address.

ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, we may be subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business. We are not currently a party to any litigation the outcome of which, if determined adversely to us, would individually or in the aggregate be reasonably expected to have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, cash flows or financial condition.

ITEM 4.   MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock has been trading on the Nasdaq Stock Market LLC under the symbol “SMLR” since September 27, 2021. From August 11, 2016 to September 26, 2021 was traded on the OTCQB under the symbol “SMLR”. From February 21, 2014 until August 11, 2016, our common stock was traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “SMLR.”

Holders

On February 25, 2022, the closing sale price of a share of our common stock was $72.36 per share and there were 6,779,058 shares of our common stock outstanding. On that date, our shares of common stock were held by approximately 29 stockholders of record. The number of record holders was determined from the records of our transfer agent and does not include beneficial owners of our common stock whose shares are held in the names of various security brokers, dealers, and registered clearing agencies.

Dividends

We have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock, and we do not anticipate declaring or paying cash dividends for the foreseeable future. We are not subject to any legal restrictions respecting the payment of dividends, except that we may not pay dividends if the payment would render us insolvent. Any future determination as to the payment of cash dividends on our common stock will be at our board of directors’ discretion and will depend on our financial condition, operating results, capital requirements and other factors that our board of directors considers to be relevant.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

Information about our equity compensation plans is incorporated herein by reference to Part III, Item 12 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

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Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

Not applicable.

Purchases of Equity Securities

Not applicable.

ITEM 6.   Reserved

Not applicable.

ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

The following discussion and analysis should be read together with our financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. This discussion contains forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. See “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Industry Data” for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks and assumptions associated with these statements. Actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

Overview

We are a company providing technology solutions to improve the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare providers. Our mission is to develop, manufacture and market innovative proprietary products and services that assist our customers in evaluating and treating chronic diseases. Our patented and FDA cleared product, QuantaFlo, which measures arterial blood flow in the extremities to aid in the diagnosis of PAD. In April 2021, we entered into an agreement with a private company to exclusively market and distribute Insulin Insights, an FDA-cleared software product that recommends optimal insulin dosing for diabetic patients in the United States, including Puerto Rico, except for select accounts. We made investments in this software company and in another private company whose product, Discern, is a test for early Alzheimer’s disease. We continue to develop additional complementary proprietary products in-house, and seek out other arrangements for additional products and services that we believe will bring value to our customers and to our company. We believe our current products and services, and any future products or services that we may offer, position us to provide valuable information to our customer base, which in turn permits them to better guide patient care.

In the year ended December 31, 2021, we had total revenues of $53.0 million and net income of $17.2 million compared to total revenues of $38.6 million and net income of $14.0 million in 2020. We had an income tax expense of $2.2 million in 2021, compared to $2.5 million in 2020. Our pre-tax net income was $19.5 million in 2021 compared to $16.5 million in 2020.

Recent Developments

Late in the first quarter and into the second quarter of 2020, we experienced decreased test volumes due to COVID-19 related “social distancing” and other executive orders mandating “shelter-in-place” or similar restrictions. These governmental restrictions limited patient visits by our customers, and restricted participation in trade shows and in-person training. As such restrictions have been lifted around the country and non-emergency medical services resumed in late 2020, our business returned to and even exceeded pre-COVID-19 levels. However, sales personnel continued to be limited in ability to attend trade shows and conduct in-person training through early 2021. In the third and fourth quarters of 2020, we experienced even higher test volumes as our customers accelerated usage due to a backlog of untested patients. In 2021, variable fee license revenues (fee-per-test), which grew strongly in the first half of 2021, decreased sequentially in the second half of 2021. We believe this new pattern in the home-testing market is due to a

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COVID-19 related timing change in the behavior of insurance plans when ordering QuantaFlo testing from our health risk assessment customers. We believe this new pattern of testing earlier in the year and the effect on variable fee license revenues may not continue in 2022 or even beyond 2022. However, in January 2022 compared to December 2021, fixed-fee monthly license revenues increased by approximately 1% while variable fee license revenues (i.e. fee-per-test) increased by approximately 87%. Comparing January 2022 to January 2021, fixed-fee monthly revenues increased by approximately 13%, while variable fee license revenues increased by approximately 6%. All numbers for January 2022 are preliminary and unaudited.

As we look forward into 2022, there is continued uncertainty as recent outbreaks of variants have occurred and vaccination rates lag in certain jurisdictions. New, additional or different restrictions could be imposed, which could impact the usage of our product by our customers, or further impact the timing of demand for our products. Other customers who have fixed-fee licenses could decide to cancel their licenses if they are not able to use our device as frequently as they had anticipated in light of such restrictions.

In April 2021, following on our October 2020 minority investment in Mellitus Health Inc., we entered into a distribution agreement for its software product, Insulin Insights, and pre-paid for $2.0 million of software licenses. We began implementing our marketing plan in the second half of the year.

In November 2021, we mutually agreed to terminate an exclusive distribution agreement with a private company for its product line and took a charge of $1.2 million of product inventory, preferring to focus on products having higher margin and larger revenue opportunities.

Sources of Revenues and Expenses

Revenues

We generate revenues primarily from the rental or license of our vascular testing product. We recognize revenues from the licensing of our vascular testing product pursuant to agreements that normally automatically renew each month with revenues recognized on a daily convention basis. Our arrangements with customers for our vascular testing product are normally on a month-to-month basis with fees billed at the rates established in our customer agreements, which are either fixed fees, or variable fees based on usage. We also recognize revenue for hardware and supplies sales, as well as sales of product licenses under our exclusive marketing and distribution agreement, as of the date of shipment.

Cost of revenues

Our cost of revenues for our vascular testing product consists primarily of five components: the depreciation expense of our vascular testing product for lease; the write-off of the residual value of our vascular testing products retired from active leasing; manufacturing oversight personnel costs; the cost of hardware and supplies sold; and other miscellaneous items, such as freight, that are not directly related to product production. Each vascular testing product unit has a depreciation schedule based on the cost of the unit. The cost of each unit is depreciated on a straight-line basis over 36 months. Each unit has its own cost of production, which varies from time to time. We believe that the cost of each unit is a function of manufacturing efficiencies, supply costs and fixed overhead expense as affected by volume of units produced, which change from time to time. When cost of production is lower, the new units have a lower monthly depreciation and decrease the average depreciation per unit per month, which means our cost of revenues is lower. Similarly, if cost of production is higher, the new units will have a higher monthly depreciation and increase the average depreciation per unit per month, which means our cost of revenues is higher. We believe growth in the number of monthly depreciation charges is predominately due to our sales and marketing efforts, which add new customers to an established customer base. The retirement of units from active leasing is primarily a function of the aggregate number of vascular testing units rented and the occurrence from time to time of system upgrades. The cost of hardware or supplies sold are the cost of production for the item sold. The other costs of revenue vary primarily as a function of the aggregate number of vascular testing units rented and changes in operations such as manufacturing, delivery or maintenance.

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Engineering and product development expense

Our engineering and product development expense consists of costs associated with the design, development, testing and enhancement of our vascular testing product and other products in development. We also include salaries and related employee benefits, research-related overhead expenses and fees paid to external service providers in our engineering and product development expense.

Sales and marketing expense

Our sales and marketing expense consists primarily of sales commissions and support costs, salaries and related employee benefits, travel, education, trade show and marketing costs.

General and administrative expense

Our general and administrative expense consists primarily of salaries and related employee benefits, professional service fees, associated travel costs and depreciation and amortization expense.

Total other expense

Our total other income expense primarily reflects other taxes and fees as well as interest income and expense.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires the use of estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures in the financial statements. Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that may be material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change, and that have a material impact on financial condition or operating performance. While we base our estimates and judgments on our experience and on various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. Our most critical accounting estimates include:

the allowance for doubtful accounts, which impacts revenue;
the valuation of inventory, which impacts profit margins;
the recognition and measurement of current and deferred income taxes (including the measurement of uncertain tax positions), which impact our provision for taxes; and
the valuation and recognition of investments, which impacts our investment portfolio balance when we assess fair value and interest and other income, net, when we record impairments.

For additional information relating to these and other accounting policies, see Note 2 to our audited financial statements, appearing elsewhere in this this annual report on Form 10-K.

Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenue from the licensing of our vascular testing product pursuant to agreements that automatically renew each month with revenue recognized on a daily convention basis. Our arrangements with customers for our vascular testing product are normally on a month-to-month basis with fees billed at the rates established in the customer agreement, which are either fixed fees or variable fees based on usage. We also recognize revenue for hardware and supplies sales as of the date of shipment. Our sale arrangements contain multiple products and services, including License fee for vascular testing product, system accessories, and service. Other than service, we generally deliver all of

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the products upfront. Each of these products and services is a distinct performance obligation. System accessories and service are also sold on a standalone basis.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We make estimates of the collectability of accounts receivable, especially analyzing the aging and nature of accounts receivable and historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer credit-worthiness, current economic trends, and changes in customer payment terms when evaluating the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts. Credit evaluations are undertaken for all major sales transactions before shipment is authorized. On a quarterly basis, we evaluate aged items in the accounts receivable aging report and provide an allowance in an amount that we deem adequate for doubtful accounts. If management were to make different judgments or utilize different estimates, material differences in the amount of our reported operating expenses could result.

Inventory Valuation

Inventory is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value on a first-in, first-out basis. The cost basis of our inventory is reduced for any products that are considered excessive or obsolete based upon assumptions about future demand and market conditions. If actual future demand or market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, additional inventory write-downs may be required, which could have a material adverse effect on the results of our operations. For example, in the fourth quarter of 2021 we terminated a distribution agreement and wrote-down $1.2 million of inventory.

Accounting for Income Taxes

Deferred income taxes result primarily from temporary differences between financial and tax reporting. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement basis and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates. Future tax benefits are subject to a valuation allowance when management is unable to conclude that our deferred tax assets will more-likely-than-not be realized from the results of operations.

The calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations. We recognize liabilities for uncertain tax positions based on a two-step process. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. If we determine that a tax position will more likely than not be sustained on audit, then the second step requires us to estimate and measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement. It is inherently difficult and subjective to estimate such amounts, as we have to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. We re-evaluate these uncertain tax positions on a quarterly basis. This evaluation is based on factors including, but not limited to, changes in facts or circumstances, changes in tax law, effective settlement of audit issues, and new audit activity. Such a change in recognition or measurement would result in the recognition of a tax benefit or an additional charge to the tax provision.

Investment Valuation

We have investments in equity securities in privately held companies without readily determinable fair values, which are generally recorded at cost, plus or minus subsequent observable price changes in orderly transactions for identical or similar investments, less impairments. As part of our assessment for impairment indicators, we consider significant deterioration in the earnings performance and overall business prospects of the investee as well as significant adverse changes in the external environment these investments operate. If our qualitative assessment indicates the investments are impaired, the fair value of these equity securities would be estimated, which would involve a significant degree of judgement and subjectivity.

No impairment charges were recorded during the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.

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Factors Affecting Future Results

We have not identified any other factors that have a recurring effect that are necessary to understand period to period comparisons as appropriate, nor any one-time events that have an effect on the financials.

Results of Operations

Year Ended December 31, 2021 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2020

Revenues

We had revenues of $53.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $38.6 million in 2020. Our revenues are primarily from fees charged to customers for use of our vascular testing products and from sale of accessories used with these products. We recognized revenues of $52.0 million from fees for our vascular testing products in 2021, consisting of $30.5 million from fixed-fee licenses and $21.5 million from variable-fee licenses, compared to $37.3 million in 2020, consisting of $25.7 million from fixed-fee licenses and $11.6 million from variable-fee licenses. The remainder was from other equipment/supply sales of accessories, which were $1.0 million in 2021 as compared to $1.3 million in 2020.

Revenues from fees for vascular testing products are recognized monthly for each unit installed with a customer, usually billed as a fixed monthly fee or as a variable monthly fee dependent on usage. The primary reason for the increase in revenues was growth in the number of installed units from both new customers and established customers, which we believe is the result of our sales and marketing efforts. We have not yet generated any material revenues under our Insulin Insights distribution agreement.

Operating Expenses

We had total operating expenses of $33.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $22.6 million in 2020. The primary reason for this change was overall growth in our business, increased compensation of the sales team and increased headcount of field sales and technical support personnel to service the expanding number of customers, and the write-down of $1.2 million of inventory in the fourth quarter of 2021 due to our termination of a distribution agreement. As a percentage of revenues, operating expenses increased to 63% in 2021, as compared to 59% in 2020. The changes in the various components of our operating expenses are described below.

Cost of Revenues

We had cost of revenues of $6.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $3.4 million for 2020. The primary reasons for this change were the inventory write-down of $1.2 million due to cancellation of the distribution agreement, as well as increased personnel costs due to increased headcount and increased depreciation on leased assets. As a percentage of revenues, cost of revenues increased to 12% in 2021, as compared to 9% in 2020. Excluding the effect of the $1.2 million write-down of inventory, adjusted cost of revenues was unchanged at 9% in 2021.

Engineering and Product Development Expense

We had engineering and product development expense of $3.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $2.9 million in 2020. The increase was primarily due to personnel, consulting fees, clinical studies and other costs associated with our product development and customization efforts. As a percentage of revenues, engineering and product development expense was 7% in 2021 compared to 8% in 2020.

Sales and Marketing Expense

We had sales and marketing expense of $14.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $9.9 million in 2020. The increase was primarily due to higher sales compensation and personnel expense, higher dues and

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subscriptions, consulting fee and other expenses. As a percentage of revenues, sales and marketing expense increased to 27% in 2021, as compared to 26% in 2020.

General and Administrative Expense

We had general and administrative expense of $9.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $6.4 million in 2020. The increase was primarily due to employee compensation related expenses, higher insurance, and dues and subscriptions, partially offset by lower local state and taxes. As a percentage of revenues, general and administrative expense was 17% in both 2021 and 2020 years.

Other Income and Expense

We had other income of $10,000 for 2021, compared to $525,000 in 2020. The decrease was primarily due to interest income associated with notes receivable and the sale of an equity in a private company in the prior year.

Provision for Taxes

In 2021, we recorded an income tax expense of $2.2 million, compared to $2.5 million in 2020. The decrease was primarily due to windfall gains resulted from the exercise of stock options. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, we had federal NOL carryforwards of $0.1 million and $0.3 million, respectively.

Net Income

For the foregoing reasons, we had a net income of $17.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to a net income of $14.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or U.S. GAAP, and pursuant to accounting requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission. In an effort to provide investors with additional information regarding the results and to provide a meaningful period-over-period comparison of our financial performance, we sometimes use non-U.S. GAAP financial measures, or NGFMs, as defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission. In this annual report, we use the NGFMs of adjusted cost of revenues as a percentage of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2021. Our management uses this NGFM because it adjusts for an event that management believes is not related to its core business, namely a $1.2 million write-down of inventory resulting from termination of a distribution agreement. Our management uses this NGFM to evaluate our financial performance against internal budgets and targets. Our management believes that this NGFM is useful for evaluating our core operating results and facilitating comparison across reporting periods. We believe this NGFM should be considered in addition to, and not in lieu of, GAAP financial measures. Our NGFM may be different from the same NGFMs used by other companies.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

We had cash and cash equivalents of $37.3 million at December 31, 2021, compared to $22.1 million at December 31, 2020, and total current liabilities of $4.9 million at December 31, 2021, compared to $4.5 million at December 31, 2020. As of December 31, 2021, we had working capital of approximately $40.7 million.

Our cash is held in a variety of non-interest bearing bank accounts and interest-bearing instruments subject to investment guidelines allowing for holdings in U.S. government and agency securities, corporate securities, taxable municipal bonds, commercial paper and money market accounts. In addition, we have, and may in the future, choose to invest some of our cash resources in other entities that may have complementary technologies or product offerings.

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Operating Activities

We generated $16.1 million of net cash from operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $15.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. The improvement was primarily due to changes in net income, as well as both non-cash adjustments and operating assets and liabilities. Non-cash adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash from operating activities were $3.4 million in the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $2.8 million in the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to a $1.2 million inventory write-off, an increase of stock-based compensation and depreciation, partially offset by a decrease in deferred tax expense. Prior year there was a non-cash investment income due to retirement of interest on notes and investments, which also resulted in current year increase of non-cash adjustment. Changes in operating assets and liabilities used $4.6 million of net cash in the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $1.7 million of net cash in the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets due to overall growth in our business, increase in trade receivables, increase in inventory and decrease in trade payables, partially offset by an increase of accrued expenses due to timing of payments to the vendors.

Investing Activities

We used $0.8 million of net cash in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $1.0 million of net cash in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2020. The decrease was primarily attributable to decrease in purchase of assets for lease and decrease of one-time investment transaction, partially offset by an increase of property, plant and equipment due to higher headcount.

Financing Activities

We generated $13,000 of net cash from financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $230,000 during the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to proceeds from the exercise of stock options of $58,000, partially offset by taxes paid related to equity awards of $45,000.

ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Not applicable.

ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The financial statements and supplementary data required by this item are included in Part IV, Item 15 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

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ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure material information required to be disclosed in our reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer, our Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting and our Vice President, Finance, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required financial disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, we recognized that a control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected. Management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

Under the supervision of and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer, our Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting and our Vice President, Finance, we evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of December 31, 2021. Based upon that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer, our Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting and our Vice President, Finance concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2021.

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f). We maintain internal control over financial reporting designed to provide reasonable, but not absolute, assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Therefore, internal control over financial reporting determined to be effective provides only reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer, our Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting and our Vice President, Finance, our management evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021. In making its assessment of internal control over financial reporting, our management used the criteria described in the 2013 Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Our evaluation included documenting, evaluating and testing the design and operating effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Based on this evaluation, we concluded that we maintain effective control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION

None.

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ITEM 9C.DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS

None.

PART III

ITEM 10.   DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Board of Directors and Executive Officers

The following are our directors and executive officers and their respective ages and positions as of the date of this annual report on Form 10-K:

Name

    

Age

    

Position

    

Director Since

    

Term Expires

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian, M.D.

 

67

 

Chief Executive Officer and Director

 

September 2012

 

2024

Andrew B. Weinstein

 

57

 

Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting

 

N/A

 

N/A

Daniel E. Conger

 

45

 

Vice President, Finance

 

N/A

 

N/A

Arthur “Abbie” Leibowitz, M.D., F.A.A.P.

 

75

 

Director

 

June 2014

 

2023

Daniel S. Messina

66

Director

August 2020

2024

Cindy H. Moon

45

Director

November 2020

2023

Wayne T. Pan, M.D., Ph.D.

 

58

 

Director

 

May 2014

 

2022

Board of Directors

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian, M.D. — Dr. Douglas Murphy-Chutorian has served as a member of our board of directors since September 2012 and as our chief executive officer since October 31, 2012. Dr. Murphy-Chutorian has had broad, diverse career experience in healthcare over the past 30 years, stretching from clinician, academician, inventor, entrepreneur, chief executive officer, chairman of the board, and consultant to financial firms. From 2005 to 2012, he was managing director of Select Healthcare Capital, LLC. Dr. Murphy-Chutorian is a named inventor on more than 30 patents, and has guided more than 50 products through various regulatory approval processes. His business career has included extensive involvement in all facets of the medical industry from financial, research and development, manufacturing, marketing and sales, regulatory, reimbursement, and clinical trials. His breadth of healthcare experience includes all major sectors of the industry: medical devices, health services, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and managed care. He received his B.A. and M.D. from Columbia University. He completed his internal medicine residency at New York University/Bellevue Medical Center and his fellowship in cardiology at Stanford University Medical Center. He has served as a faculty member in interventional cardiology at both Stanford and Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Murphy-Chutorian’s experience as a cardiologist, inventor and executive, in particular serving as our Chief Executive Officer, qualify him to be a director of our company.

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Arthur “Abbie” Leibowitz, M.D., F.A.A.P. — Dr. Arthur “Abbie” Leibowitz has served as a member of our board of directors since June 2014. Dr. Leibowitz has over 50 years of experience in healthcare, with more than 35 years in leading positions with several healthcare companies. Dr. Leibowitz is the chief medical officer and president emeritus at Health Advocate, Inc., a health advocacy and assistance company he co-founded in 2000 that provides support and helps consumers navigate the healthcare system. In June 2014, Health Advocate, Inc. became a wholly owned subsidiary of the West Corporation. West Corporation was in turn acquired and taken private by Apollo Global Management, LLC in October 2017. Health Advocate is now under a pending agreement of sale to Teleperformance, a leading global group in digitally integrated business solutions. The sale is expected to close in the first quarter of 2021. Health Advocate Inc.’s clients include more than 12,000 small, medium, and large sized companies, not-for-profit organizations and associations, schools, colleges and universities, unions, health plans, and third-party administrators across the United States. Prior to his role at Health Advocate, Inc., Dr. Leibowitz served as executive vice president of digital health strategies and a member of the board of directors at Medicologic, Inc., where he was responsible for developing healthcare data, information services and strategies targeted at users of the company’s electronic medical record system, as well as data customers including payors, pharmaceutical companies, employers, regulatory and government agencies. Dr. Leibowitz served as vice president, medical delivery systems and chief medical officer at Aetna U.S. Healthcare, from 1996 to 2000, where he directed medical affairs and policies for one of the largest health benefits companies in the nation. In this role he was responsible for clinical policy development, technology assessment, patient management activities, and quality improvement programs. From 1993 to 1996, Dr. Leibowitz was the vice president, health delivery, corporate medical director at U.S. Healthcare, where he coordinated the expansion of medical programs regionally into eight new markets. Dr. Leibowitz had also served as vice president, health delivery, and a network medical director at U.S. Healthcare, from 1987 to 1993. From 1975 to 1987, Dr. Leibowitz was the senior physician at Drexel Hill Pediatric Associates, where he established seven physician pediatric group practice serving a large and diverse urban/suburban patient population. Dr. Leibowitz has authored many articles in the medical literature and has made numerous media appearances. Dr. Leibowitz received both his B.A. and M.D. degrees from Temple University. We believe Dr. Leibowitz’s extensive background, experience and knowledge of the healthcare industry qualify him to be a director of our company.

Daniel S. Messina — Daniel S. Messina has served as a member of our board of directors since August 2020. Mr. Messina has nearly 40 years of broad business experience as both a healthcare system professional and a technology solutions entrepreneur. Mr. Messina is the co-founder of HandsFree Health, the creator of WellBe®, the premier voice enabled virtual health assistant platform designed to help individuals access their health and wellness resources from home. Prior to co-founding HandsFree Health in 2016, he was a partner of West Corporation’s health advocate division for ten years, and he concluded his time there as co-president. From 2002 to 2006, Mr. Messina was the president of Rendina Healthcare Real Estate. Before that, from 2000 to 2002, Mr. Messina served as chief executive officer and president of Magellan Health and from 1998 to 2000 as the chief financial officer and head of business strategy of Aetna Health. For the decade prior to that, he was vice president of Financial Reporting at Cigna Corporation. Mr. Messina began his career as a certified public accountant at Deloitte. Mr. Messina earned a Bachelor of Science in accounting from the University of Notre Dame. We believe Mr. Messina’s extensive experience in virtual health and healthcare systems qualifies him to be a director of our company.

Cindy Moon — Cindy Moon has served as a member of our board of directors since November 2020. Ms. Moon, a D.C.-based, healthcare payment policy expert, is Vice President of Health Care Payment and Delivery Reform with Hart Health Strategies Inc., a bipartisan consulting and lobbying firm specializing in legislative and regulatory health care issues. Prior to joining Hart Health Strategies Inc., Ms. Moon worked at the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) where she advised on policy solutions affecting the Medicare program. In this role, Ms. Moon collaborated with federal stakeholders across the Executive Office of the President, the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Secretary, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to oversee implementation of major payment and programmatic changes to the Medicare program. Prior to joining OMB, Ms. Moon held successively increasing leadership positions within the Health Plan of San Mateo, a quasi-public health plan offering publicly-sponsored health coverage for qualifying residents of San Mateo County, California. Ms. Moon earned her Master of Public Policy and Master of Public Health from the University of California at Berkeley and her Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University. We believe Ms. Moon’s extensive experience in shaping federal healthcare policy and promoting high-value care qualifies her to be a director of our company.

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Wayne T. Pan, M.D., Ph.D., MBA — Dr. Wayne T. Pan has served as a member of our board of directors since May 2014. Dr. Pan has over 20 years of broad healthcare industry experience from clinical medicine, to managed care, health information technology and biotechnology. Dr. Pan is currently a medical director in Global Medical Affairs at BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., functioning as the Global Medical Lead for products in development treating achondroplasia and other short-stature conditions. He is also a part-time associate medical director at San Francisco Health Plan, responsible for utilization management and appeals and grievances, and is a Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of Salusive Health, dba mynurse.ai, a private healthcare technology company focused on chronic condition management and remote patient monitoring for seniors with chronic conditions. From April 2016 to February 2018, he was a medical director in Quality of Care and Health Economics and Outcomes Research, US Medical Affairs at Genentech, Inc., a biotechnology company based in South San Francisco. From April 2015 to April 2016, Dr. Pan served as the chief medical officer at Applied Research Works, a healthcare software technology company based in Palo Alto, offering health plans and integrated delivery systems, a cloud-based platform providing timely, actionable clinical data to providers at the point of care. From October 2014 to April 2015, Dr. Pan served as medical director in the technology group of Clover Health Labs, a start-up integrated healthcare delivery system based on the East Coast that includes a hospital system, a medical group and affiliated independent physicians, and a Medicare and Medicaid health plan. From June 2014 to April 2015 he served as the Chief Medical Officer at Santa Clara County IPA (SCCIPA), a large independent physician association in Santa Clara County, California with 800 multi-specialty physicians with 80,000 covered lives in commercial (HMO/ACO) and Medicare Advantage (HMO/ACO) programs. From August 2012 to May 2014 Dr. Pan served as chief medical officer at Thrasys, Inc., a global healthcare technology company that provides a cloud-based platform upon which healthcare delivery systems and provider organizations can build high quality, person-centered accountable care communities. Between October 2010 and July 2012, Dr. Pan was concurrently the chief medical informatics officer for Health Access Solutions, a health care software development company and chief medical officer of Pacific Partners Management Services, Inc., a medical management services company serving medical groups in northern California with over 50,000 covered lives. Prior to that, between September 2009 and February 2010, he served as chief medical officer for Affinity Medical Solutions, LLC, a medical management services organization serving independent physicians association clients and managing commercial and Medicare Advantage members. Dr. Pan has also served as chief medical officer between June 2008 and August 2009 for Alameda Alliance for Health, a local initiative health plan with Medicaid, Medicare Advantage Dual Eligible SNP and IHSS plans, and as an advisory chief medical officer at a data analytics start-up focused on big data issues in healthcare in 2007-2008. Dr. Pan holds an M.B.A. from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and an M.D. and Ph.D. from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and a B.S. in Biology from Johns Hopkins University. We believe Dr. Pan’s extensive healthcare-related business experience qualifies him to be a director of our company.

Other than as described above in the biographies, there are no family relationships among any of our directors or executive officers.

Executive Officers

Andrew B. Weinstein — Mr. Weinstein has served as our Senior Vice President, Finance and Accounting since October 2018. He previously served as the Vice President of Accounting since joining our company in March 2017. From May 2006 until joining our company, Mr. Weinstein served as Vice President, Controller and member of senior management at Health Advocate, Inc., a health advocacy and assistance company that provides support and helps consumers navigate the healthcare system. During his tenure at Health Advocate, Mr. Weinstein was responsible for all accounting, finance, payroll, benefits and financial reporting activities of the company and its four subsidiaries, leading a team of eighteen people. He also served as a director of two of Health Advocate’s subsidiaries. Mr. Weinstein received a B.S. in Accounting from Pennsylvania State University and is a Certified Public Accountant (Pennsylvania).

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Daniel E. Conger — Mr. Daniel E. Conger has served as our Vice President of Finance since October 2010. From September 2008 until joining our company, Mr. Conger worked at Bacchus Vascular and its acquirer Covidien, Inc., a medical device, supplies and pharmaceuticals company, where he was the Plant Controller for the San Jose plant. At Covidien, Mr. Conger was responsible for creation of a $130 million annual budget, leading a team of six people. He had responsibility for preparation of monthly and quarterly financial statements, and presented quarterly results to executive management of the global business unit. Mr. Conger has been working in the medical device, start-up and biotechnology industries since 2006, and has experience designing internal control systems, implementing such systems, and running finance in a business centered manner. He received his B.S. in Business Administration from Humboldt State University in May 2001 and an MBA-Accounting Option from California State University East Bay in June 2010.

Director Independence

As required under the Nasdaq listing standards, a majority of the members of our board of directors must qualify as “independent,” as affirmatively determined by the board of directors. Our board of directors consults with our outside counsel to ensure that its determinations are consistent with relevant securities and other laws and regulations regarding the definition of “independent,” including those set forth in pertinent listing standards of Nasdaq, as in effect from time to time.

Consistent with these considerations, after review of all relevant identified transactions or relationships between each director, or any of his or her family members and our company, our senior management and our independent auditors, our board of directors has affirmatively determined that the following four directors are independent directors within the meaning of the applicable Nasdaq listing standards: Dr. Leibowitz, Mr. Messina, Ms. Moon, and Dr. Pan. In making this determination, the board of directors found that none of these directors had a material or other disqualifying relationship with our company.

In making such determinations, our board of directors considered the relationships that each such director has with our company, including the relationships and transactions described in the section of this annual report on Form 10-K captioned “Certain Relationships And Related Transactions, And Director Independence,” and all other facts and circumstances that our board of directors deemed relevant in determining his independence, including the beneficial ownership of our capital stock by each director.

Changes to Procedures for Recommending Nominees to Board of Directors

None.

Audit Committee

Our board of directors has established a separately designated standing audit committee, which is currently comprised of Dr. Pan, who serves as both member and Chairman, Mr. Messina, and Ms. Moon. Our board of directors has determined that Mr. Messina qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” within the meaning of the SEC’s rules.

Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our directors and executive officers, and persons who own more than ten percent of a registered class of our equity securities, to file with the SEC initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of our common stock and other equity securities. Officers, directors and greater than ten percent stockholders are required by SEC regulation to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file.

To our knowledge, based solely on a review of the copies of such reports furnished to us and written representations that no other reports were required, during the year ended December 31, 2021, all Section 16(a) filing requirements applicable to our officers, directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners were in compliance, other than two late Form 4 filings by Douglas Murphy Chutorian, in each case reporting a 10b5-1 plan sales transaction.

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Code of Ethics

We have adopted a code of ethics that applies to our principal executive officer (our chief executive officer), our principal financial officer (our senior vice president, finance and accounting), principal accounting officer (our vice president of finance) and other officers performing similar functions, which we refer to as the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics. The Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available on our website at http://www.semlercientific.com under the Corporate Governance section of the Investors portion of our website. Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is designed to meet the requirements of Item 406 of Regulation S-K. We will promptly disclose on our website (i) the nature of any amendment to the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to any covered person, and (ii) the nature of any waiver, including an implicit waiver, from a provision of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that is granted to one of the covered persons.

ITEM 11.EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Summary Compensation Table

The following table sets forth the information as to compensation paid to or earned by our (i) principal executive officer and (ii) the two most highly compensated executive officers other than our principal executive officer. These individuals are referred to in this annual report on Form 10-K as our named executive officers, and were our only executive officers during the year ended December 31, 2021. As none of our named executive officers received any stock awards, option awards or nonqualified deferred compensation earnings during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, we have omitted those columns from the table.

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

All Other

Fiscal

Salary

Bonus

Compensation

Compensation

Total

Name and Principal Position

    

Year

    

($)(1)

    

($)(2)

    

($)(3)

    

($)(4)

    

($)

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian, M.D.,

2021

$

400,000

$

0

$

400,000

$

71,395

$

871,395

director and chief executive officer

2020

$

400,000

$

0

$

300,000

$

21,982

$

721,982

Andrew B Weinstein,

2021

$

322,500

$

66,000

$

0

$

46,201

$

434,701

senior vice president, finance and accounting

 

2020

$

294,792

$

60,000

$

0

$

31,545

$

386,337

Daniel E. Conger,

 

2021

$

210,000

$

44,500

$

0

$

44,328

$

298,828

vice president, finance

 

2020

$

210,000

$

42,000

$

0

$

31,545

$

283,545

(1)

For Mr. Weinstein, reflects his salary increase effective March 15, 2021.

(2)

For Mr. Conger, 2021 includes an additional $2,500 spot bonus.

(3)

The amounts represent performance-based cash incentives earned by Dr. Murphy-Chutorian based on the achievement of certain company goals and his target incentive compensation amount. Incentive compensation awards are paid annually, based on the achievement of the objectives set by the compensation committee of our board of directors at the beginning of the fiscal year.

(4)

Represents payment of health insurance premiums pursuant to the terms of employment agreements.

Named Executive Officer Compensation Arrangements

We enter into individually negotiated compensation arrangements with each of our named executive officers. Our named executive officers may receive salary, bonus and other benefits, such as the payment of health insurance premiums or other individually negotiated health benefits pursuant to the terms of their negotiated compensation package. We may also grant our named executive officers awards under our equity incentive plans.

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian, M.D.

At the time he joined our company as a director, and subsequently as our chief executive officer, Dr. Murphy-Chutorian did not have a formal employment agreement with our company. We engaged Dr. Murphy-Chutorian as an independent contractor, and he received sales commissions, and then later, a monthly stipend of $16,000, in addition to such sales commissions. In September 2012, Dr. Murphy-Chutorian became a director and, effective October 31, 2012, our chief executive officer. On November 11, 2013, we entered into an at-will employment agreement with Dr. Murphy-

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Chutorian. Under the terms of this agreement, Dr. Murphy-Chutorian can be terminated at any time and his job titles, salaries and benefits may be modified from time to time as we deem necessary.

In 2021, Dr. Murphy-Chutorian’s base salary was $400,000, with target incentive equal to 100% of base salary with up to $100,000 achievable per fiscal quarter. Effective, January 1, 2022, Dr. Murphy-Chutorian’s base salary is $450,000, with target incentive equal to 89% of base salary, with up to $100,000 achievable per fiscal quarter.

Andrew B. Weinstein

On March 14, 2017, we entered into an at-will employment agreement with Mr. Weinstein, our senior vice president, finance and accounting. Under the terms of the agreement, Mr. Weinstein can be terminated at any time and his job titles, salaries and benefits may be modified from time to time as we deem necessary. At the start of 2020, Mr. Weinstein’s base salary was $275,000, with a discretionary bonus equal to 20% of base salary. Effective March 15, 2021, Mr. Weinstein’s base salary was increased to $330,000 (from $300,000), with a discretionary bonus of $66,000 (increased from $60,000).

Daniel E. Conger

On October 18, 2010, we entered into an at-will employment agreement with Mr. Conger, our vice president of finance. Under the terms of the agreement, Mr. Conger can be terminated at any time and his job titles, salaries and benefits may be modified from time to time as we deem necessary. In 2021, Mr. Conger’s base salary was $210,000, with a discretionary bonus of $42,000. Effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Conger’s base salary is $216,500, with a discretionary bonus of $43,300.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

The following table provides information about the number of outstanding equity awards held by our named executive officers at December 31, 2021. We have omitted certain columns from the table as we do not have any outstanding stock awards.

Number of

Number of

Securities

Securities

Underlying

Underlying

Unexercised

Unexercised

Option

Option

Options (#)

Options (#)

Exercise Price

Expiration

Name

    

Exercisable

    

Unexercisable

    

($)

    

Date

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

85,000

0

$

2.10

11/08/2024

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

75,000

0

$

1.96

12/31/2024

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

180,000

0

$

3.44

07/20/2025

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

60,000

0

$

2.56

12/31/2025

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

 

125,000

 

0

$

2.23

 

02/17/2026

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

 

125,000

 

0

$

1.72

 

01/19/2027

Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(1)

 

125,000

 

0

$

8.00

 

12/31/2027

Andrew B. Weinstein(1)

 

30,000

 

0

$

3.15

 

03/14/2027

(1)

All the above options are fully vested.

Director Compensation

The following table shows the compensation earned in the year ended December 31, 2021 by our non-employee directors. Our non-employee directors received cash, director fees and stock awards in 2021, so we have omitted certain columns from the table. The compensation information for Dr. Murphy-Chutorian, our chief executive officer and a

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director, is set forth in “ Summary Compensation Table.” Dr. Murphy-Chutorian does not receive additional compensation for his services as a director.

Fees Earned or

Stock Awards

Paid in Cash

Name

    

($)(1)

    

($)(2)

Total ($)

Arthur “Abbie” Leibowitz, M.D., F.A.A.P.

$

67,500

$

100,000

$

167,500

Wayne T. Pan, M.D., Ph.D.

$

75,000

$

100,000

$

175,000

Cindy H. Moon

$

59,250

$

100,000

$

159,250

Daniel S. Messina

$

59,250

$

100,000

$

159,250

(1)Consists of the annual retainer fee for service as a non-employee member of the board of directors or any board committee. For further information concerning such fees, see the section below entitled “—Non-Employee Director Compensation Policy.”

(2)Represents the grant date fair value of the awards computed in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation, or ASC 718.

Non-Employee Director Compensation Policy

Our non-employee director compensation program is currently as follows:

All non-employee directors are entitled to receive an annual $45,000 retainer for service as a board member ($82,500 for non-employee chairman of the board, if any) and an annual retainer for each committee on which they serve as a member:

$22,500 per year for service as chairman of the audit committee or $11,250 per year for service as a member of the audit committee;
$15,000 per year for service as chairman of the compensation committee or $7,500 per year for service as a member of the compensation committee;
$7,500 per year for service as chairman of the nominating committee or $3,000 per year for service as a member of the nominating committee;

Cash payments to non-employee directors are to be paid quarterly and will be pro-rated for directors who join the board or a board committee mid-year.

In January 2021, we provided equity compensation to each of our non-employee directors for service on our board consisting of 1,089 shares of our common stock, which awards were granted under the 2014 Stock Incentive Plan, or the 2014 Plan. The number of shares of common stock awarded was determined based on $100,000 divided by the closing price on the grant date and such stock awards were fully vested on the grant date. In January 2022, we granted common stock to each of our non-employee directors for service on our board consisting of 1,340 shares, which awards were granted under the 2014 Plan. The number of shares of common stock awarded was determined based on $100,000 divided by the closing price on the grant date and such stock awards were fully vested on the grant date.

Compensation-Related Risk

Our board of directors is responsible for the oversight of our risk profile, including compensation-related risks. Our compensation committee monitors our compensation policies and practices as applied to our employees to ensure that these policies and practices do not encourage excessive and unnecessary risk-taking. Our management, together with the compensation committee, reviews of our compensation programs, including our executive compensation program, to determine if such programs create risks that are likely to have a material adverse effect on our company. Based on this review, our board of directors believes that the level of risk associated with our compensation programs is not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on our company.

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ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our common stock as of February 25, 2022 of:

each person who is known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our outstanding common stock;
each of our directors;
each of our named executive officers; and
all of our directors and executive officers as a group.

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC and includes voting or investment power with respect to our common stock and is based on 6,779,058 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of February 25, 2022. Shares of our common stock subject to options or warrants that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days after February 25, 2022 are considered outstanding and beneficially owned by the person holding the options or warrants for the purpose of calculating the percentage ownership of that person but not for the purpose of calculating the percentage ownership of any other person. Except as otherwise noted, the persons and entities in the following table have sole voting and investing power with respect to all of the shares of our common stock beneficially owned by them, subject to community property laws, where applicable. Information with respect to beneficial ownership by 5% stockholders has been based on information filed with the SEC pursuant to Section 13(d) or Section 13(g) of the Exchange Act, as well as our records. Except as otherwise set forth in the footnotes to the following table, the address of each beneficial owner is c/o Semler Scientific, Inc., 2340-2348 Walsh Avenue, Suite 2344, Santa Clara, CA 95051.

Number of Shares 

Percentage of Shares 

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

    

Beneficially Owned

    

Beneficially Owned

5% Stockholders:

  

  

 

William H.C. Chang(1)

 

1,115,705

 

16.4

%

Park West Asset Management, LLC(2)

 

460,500

 

6.8

%

Eric Semler

 

568,221

 

8.4

%

Executive Officers and Directors:

 

 

Daniel E. Conger

 

 

Dr. Arthur N. Leibowitz(3)

 

52,429

 

*

Cindy H. Moon(4)

 

6,846

 

*

Daniel S. Messina(5)

 

7,429

 

*

Dr. Douglas Murphy-Chutorian(6)

863,446

11.3

%

Dr. Wayne T. Pan(7)

45,118

*

Andrew B. Weinstein(8)

30,000

*

All directors and officers as a group (7 persons)

 

1,003,268

 

13.0

%

*

Less than 1%

(1)

Includes (a) 283,989 shares of our common stock held by the Chang Family Trust U/A DTD 10/23/2006, or the Chang Family Trust, for which Mr. and Mrs. Chang are co-trustees and share voting and investment control, (b) 295,104 shares of our common stock held in six separate grantor retained annuity trusts, or GRATs, for which Mr. Chang acts as sole trustee and has voting and investment control, (c) 295,104 shares of our common stock held in six separate GRATs for which Mrs. Chang acts as sole trustee and has voting and investment control and (d) 241,508 shares of our common stock held by Chang 2020 GP LLC, for which Mr. and Mrs. Chang are the sole managers and share voting and investment control. The address for the Chang Family Trust, Chang 2020 GP, LLC, Mr. Chang and Mrs. Chang is 520 El Camino Real, 9th Floor, San Mateo, CA 94402.

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(2)

Includes (a) 418,994 shares of our common stock held by Park West Investors Master Fund, Limited, a Cayman Islands exempted company, or PWIMF, and (b) 41,506 shares of our common stock held by Park West Partners International, Limited, a Cayman Islands exempted company, or PWPI, and, collectively with PWIMF, the PW Funds. Park West Asset Management LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, or PWAM, is the investment manager to the PW Funds, and Peter S. Park is the sole member and manager of PWAM. PWAM and Mr. Park may be deemed to beneficially own the 460,500 shares of our common stock held in the aggregate by the PW Funds. The address of the PW Funds, PWAM and Mr. Park is 900 Larkspur Landing Circle, Suite 165, Larkspur, California 94939.

(3)

Includes (a) 1,089 shares of our common stock granted on January 1, 2021, (b) 1,340 shares our common stock granted on January 21, 2022 and (c) options to purchase 50,000 shares of our common stock.

(4)

Includes (a) 1,089 shares of our common stock granted on January 4, 2021, (b) 757 shares of our common stock net of taxes granted on January 21, 2022 and (c) options to purchase 5,000 shares of our common stock.

(5)

Includes (a) 1,089 shares of our common stock granted on January 4, 2021, (b) 1,340 shares of our common stock granted on January 21, 2022 and (c) options to purchase 5,000 shares of our common stock.

(6)

Includes (a) 23,571 shares of our common stock, (b) options to purchase an aggregate of 763,000 shares of our common stock and (c) warrants to purchase an aggregate of 76,875 shares of our common stock. Options are held by Dr. Murphy-Chutorian. Other securities are held in a family trust over which Dr. Murphy-Chutorian is co-Trustee with his spouse, and with whom he shares voting and investment power over such securities.

(7)

Includes (a) 1,089 shares of our common stock granted on January 4, 2021, (b) 1,340 shares of our common stock granted on January 21, 2022 and (c) options to purchase 46,333 shares of our common stock.

(8)

Represents options to acquire 30,000 shares of our common stock.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table sets forth information about our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2021. We do not have any equity compensation plans that have not been approved by securityholders.

    

    

    

Number of Securities      

Remaining Available for

Number of Securities

Future Issuance Under

to be Issued Upon  

Weighted Average  

Equity Compensation

Exercise of

Exercise Price of 

Plans (Excluding

Outstanding Options,

Outstanding Options, 

Securities Reflected in

Warrants and Rights 

Warrants and Rights

Column (a))

Plan Category

(#)

($)

 (#)

(a)

(b)

(c)

Equity Compensation Plans Approved by Securityholders:

  

  

  

2014 Stock Incentive Plan

1,338,245

$

3.31

1,215,753

2007 Key Person Stock Option Plan

18,000

$

2.37

0

Total

1,356,245

$

3.30

1,215,753

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The following includes a summary of transactions since January 1, 2020 to which we have been a party in which the amount involved exceeded or will exceed the lesser of (x) $120,000 or (y) 1% of our average total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any of our directors, executive officers or, to our knowledge, beneficial owners of more than 5% of our capital stock or any member of the immediate family of any of the foregoing persons had or will have a direct or indirect material interest, other than equity and other compensation, termination, change in control and other arrangements, which are described under “Management — Summary Compensation Table — Named Executive Officer Compensation Arrangements.” We also describe below certain other transactions with our directors, executive officers and stockholders.

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Review, Approval or Ratification of Transactions with Related Persons

Our board of directors has adopted a written related person transaction policy setting forth the policies and procedures for the review and approval or ratification of related-person transactions. This policy covers, with certain exceptions set forth in Item 404 of Regulation S-K under the Securities Act, any transaction, arrangement or relationship, or any series of similar transactions, arrangements or relationships in which we were or are to be a participant, where the amount involved exceeds $120,000 (or if we are a “smaller reporting company” at such time, the lesser of (x) $120,000 or (y) 1% of our average total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years) and a related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest, including, without limitation, purchases of goods or services by or from the related person or entities in which the related person has a material interest, indebtedness, guarantees of indebtedness and employment by us of a related person. In reviewing and approving any such transactions, our audit committee is tasked to consider all relevant facts and circumstances, including, but not limited to, whether the transaction is on terms comparable to those that could be obtained in an arm’s length transaction and the extent of the related person’s interest in the transaction. All of the transactions described in this section occurred prior to the adoption of this policy.

Private Company Equity Transfer

In December 2020, we transferred and sold the shares of preferred stock of a private company along with the warrants to purchase common stock we had acquired from such company in October 2020, to Eric Semler, one of our significant stockholders, for a cash purchase price of $1.9 million. We had acquired the shares of preferred stock in November 2020 upon conversion of the $1.5 million convertible promissory note we acquired from such private company in October 2020.

Employment of Immediate Family Members

We currently employ the brother-in-law and sister-in-law of Daniel E. Conger, our vice president, finance. We have paid such individuals an aggregate of $215,162 in salary and bonus payments for the year ended December 31, 2021.

ITEM 14.PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

The following table presents fees for professional audit services rendered by BDO USA, LLP, or BDO, for the audit of our consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020. In addition to retaining BDO to conduct an audit of the financial statements, we engage the firm from time to time to perform other services. The following table sets forth all fees incurred in connection with professional services rendered to us by BDO during each of the last two fiscal years.

Year Ended December 31, 

Fee Type

    

2021

    

2020

Audit Fees

$

350,700

$

328,700

Tax Fees

 

 

28,150

Total

$

350,700

$

356,850

Audit Fees. This category consists of the annual audit of our financial statements and the interim reviews of the quarterly financial statements.

Tax Fees. This category consists of services related to sales and use tax in 2020

Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

Our audit committee charter provides that the audit committee will approve the fees and other significant compensation to be paid to our independent auditors, and pre-approve all audit services and all non-audit services of independent auditors permitted under applicable law. The charter also provides that the audit committee may establish other pre-approval policies and procedures for the engagement of independent auditors to render services to us, including

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without limitation policies that would allow the delegation of pre-approval authority to one or more members of the audit committee, provided that any pre-approval decision is reported to the audit committee at its next scheduled meeting. The audit committee has approved all audit and audit-related work covered by the audit fees, tax fees and all other fees.

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PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

Financial Statements and Financial Statement Schedules

(1)

Financial Statements:

Financial statements are shown in the Index to Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

(2)

Financial Statement Schedules:

Financial statement schedules have been omitted because either they are not applicable or the required information is included in the financial statements or the notes thereto.

(3)

Exhibits

Exhibit No.

    

Description

3.1

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of our Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 2, 2015).

3.2

Second Amended and Restated Bylaws (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of our Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 26, 2021).

4.1

Specimen Common Stock certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to Amendment No. 1 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 6, 2013).

4.2*

Description of Capital Stock.

10.1

Form of Series A, Series A-1 and Series A-2 Preferred Stock Warrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement, as amended (File No. 333-192362), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 15, 2013).

10.2†

Warrant Amendment (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 21, 2015).

10.3†

2007 Key Person Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement, as amended (File No. 333-192362), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 15, 2013).

10.4†

Form of 2007 Key Person Stock Option Plan Option Grant Notice and Option Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of our Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 3, 2015).

10.5†

At-Will Employment, Confidential Information, Invention Assignment, and Arbitration Agreement between Semler Scientific, Inc. and Douglas Murphy-Chutorian, M.D., dated November 11, 2013 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement, as amended (File No. 333-192362), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 15, 2013).

10.6†

At-Will Employment, Confidential Information, Invention Assignment, and Arbitration Agreement between Semler Scientific, Inc. and Daniel E. Conger, dated October 18, 2010 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement, as amended (File No. 333-192362), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 15, 2013).

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

10.7†

At-Will Employment, Confidential Information, Invention Assignment, and Arbitration Agreement between Semler Scientific, Inc. and Andrew B. Weinstein, dated March 14, 2017 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2018).

10.8†

2014 Stock Incentive Plan, dated August 26, 2014 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 2, 2014).

10.9†

Form of 2014 Stock Incentive Plan Stock Option Grant Notice and Option Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 3, 2015).

10.10

Form of Indemnification Agreement, approved and entered into between the Company and each of the Company’s directors and executive officers as of July 24, 2014 (incorporated by referenced to Exhibit 10.1 of our Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 29, 2014).

10.11

Service & Supply Agreement between Semler Scientific, Inc. and Phoenix DeVentures, Inc. dated as of April 28, 2011(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.8 to Amendment No. 1 of our Form S-1 Registration Statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 6, 2013).

23.1*

Consent of BDO USA, LLP dated March 4, 2022.

24.1*

Power of Attorney (included on the signature page attached hereto).

31.1*

Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

31.2*

Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.1*(+)

Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.2*(+)

Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

101.INS

Inline XBRL Instance Document

101.SCH

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema

101.CAL

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase

101.DEF

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase

101.LAB

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase

101.PRE

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

104.1*

Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as inline XBRL with applicable taxonomy extension information contained in Exhibits 101).

*

Filed herewith

Indicates a management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement

(+)

The certifications attached as Exhibit 32.1 and 32.2 accompany this Annual Report on Form 10-K pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and shall not be deemed “filed” by the Company for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

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ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY

Not Applicable.

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INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Page

Financial Statements:

    

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm-BDO USA, LLP; New York, NY; PCAOB ID# 243)

F-2

Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2021 and 2020

F-4

Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

F-5

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

F-6

Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

F-7

Notes to Financial Statements

F-8

F-1

Table of Contents

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Shareholders and Board of Directors

Semler Scientific, Inc.

Santa Clara, California

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Semler Scientific, Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the related statements of income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Critical Audit Matter

The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of the critical audit matter does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.

Accounting for Long-Term Investments

As more fully described in Note 6 to the financial statements, in October 2020, the Company entered into a common stock purchase agreement (“SPA”) to purchase 211,928 shares of a private company’s common stock from certain sellers in exchange for 40,922 shares of the Company’s common stock. The total fair value of the purchase consideration was $2.23 million, with the long-term investment being accounted for as a cost method investment. As part of the SPA the Company had the right, at its sole option at any time between March 31, 2021 and October 8, 2021, to sell any or all of these shares of common stock back to the sellers of the private company in exchange for the shares of the Company’s common stock originally issued to the sellers of the private company. On April 1, 2021, the Company

F-2

Table of Contents

exercised its option to sell all of these shares of common stock back to the sellers of the private company in exchange for the shares of the Company’s common stock originally issued to the sellers of the private company, resulting in the investment being reduced by $2.23 million with a corresponding amount recorded through additional paid-in capital for the year ended December 31, 2021.

We identified the accounting for Company’s exercise of its option to sell back the shares that were acquired from the private company as a critical audit matter. Significant judgment was required in the evaluation of the contract terms pursuant to the SPA to determine the appropriate recording of the exercise of the Company’s option including consideration of this option as a potential embedded derivative. Auditing this transaction involved subjective auditor judgment due to the nature and extent of audit effort required to identify and evaluate the terms of the arrangement.

The primary procedures we performed to address this critical audit matter included the following:

Obtaining and inspecting the executed SPA and the Company’s accounting analysis, assessing the pertinent provisions of the option features and any potential embedded derivatives.
Evaluating the Company’s conclusions as compared to the relevant accounting guidance in respect to the classification, presentation and disclosure of the options within the financial statements.

/s/ BDO USA, LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2013

New York, NY

March 4, 2022

F-3

Table of Contents

Semler Scientific, Inc.

Balance Sheets

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars, except share and per share data)

December 31, 

December 31, 

2021

    

2020

Assets

Current Assets:

 

  

 

  

Cash and cash equivalents

$

37,323

$

22,079

Trade accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $61 and $61, respectively

 

3,619

 

2,808

Inventory

550

340

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

4,044

 

1,376

Total current assets

 

45,536

 

26,603

Assets for lease, net

 

1,643

 

1,941

Property and equipment, net

 

394

 

261

Other non-current assets

332

418

Long-term investments

 

821

 

3,051

Long-term deferred tax assets

1,946

2,365

Total assets

$

50,672

$

34,639

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable

$

443

$

677

Accrued expenses

 

3,436

 

2,798

Deferred revenue

 

921

 

963

Other short-term liabilities

80

76

Total current liabilities

 

4,880

 

4,514

Long-term liabilities:

 

 

  

Other long-term liabilities

245

332

Total long-term liabilities

 

245

 

332

Commitments and contingencies (Note 10)

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized; 6,824,380, and 6,725,422 shares issued, and 6,758,458 and 6,700,422 shares outstanding (treasury shares of 65,922 and 25,000, respectively)

 

7

 

7

Additional paid-in capital

 

20,645

 

22,113

Retained earnings

 

24,895

 

7,673

Total stockholders’ equity

 

45,547

 

29,793

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$

50,672

$

34,639

(See accompanying notes to financial statements)

F-4

Table of Contents

Semler Scientific, Inc.

Statements of Income

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars, except share and per share data)

For the years ended December 31,

2021

    

2020

Revenues

$

53,027

$

38,603

Operating expenses:

 

 

Cost of revenues

 

6,122

 

3,356

Engineering and product development

 

3,780

 

2,938

Sales and marketing

 

14,445

 

9,942

General and administrative

 

9,235

 

6,406

Total operating expenses

 

33,582

 

22,642

Income from operations

 

19,445

 

15,961

Interest income

 

10

 

19

Other income

 

 

506

Other income

 

10

 

525

Pre-tax net income

19,455

16,486

Income tax provision

 

2,233

 

2,479

Net income

$

17,222

$

14,007

Net income per share, basic

$

2.56

$

2.13

Weighted average number of shares used in computing basic income per share

 

6,731,693

 

6,584,441

Net income per share, diluted

$

2.12

$

1.74

Weighted average number of shares used in computing diluted income per share

8,138,608

8,066,561

(See accompanying notes to financial statements)

F-5

Table of Contents

Semler Scientific, Inc.

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars, except share and per share data)

Common Stock

Treasury Stock

Retained

Common 

Additional

Earnings

Total 

Shares

Stock

Paid-In

(Accumulated

Stockholders’

    

 Issued

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Capital

    

Deficit)

    

Equity

Balance at December 31, 2019

    

6,556,221

    

$

7

    

(25,000)

    

$

    

$

19,400

    

$

(6,334)

    

$

13,073

Employee stock grant

641

Investment in SYNAPS Dx (Note 6)

 

40,922

 

 

 

 

2,230

 

 

2,230

Stock option exercises

 

127,638

 

 

 

 

230

 

 

230

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

253

 

 

253

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,007

 

14,007

Balance at December 31, 2020

 

6,725,422

$

7

 

(25,000)

$

$

22,113

$

7,673

$

29,793

Exercise of put option in SYNAPS Dx (Note 6)

(40,922)

(2,230)

(2,230)

Employee stock grant

5,516

512

512

Stock option exercises

 

93,442

 

 

 

 

58

 

 

58

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

192

 

 

192

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

17,222

 

17,222

Balance at December 31, 2021

6,824,380

$

7

 

(65,922)

$

$

20,645

$

24,895

$

45,547

(See accompanying notes to financial statements)

F-6

Table of Contents

Semler Scientific, Inc.

Statements of Cash Flows

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars)